Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Below is a listing of the individual lower- and upper-division courses offered through the Writing Program. Note that writing courses cannot be taken P/NP.

Lower Division

Writing 1. Approaches to University Writing

4 units
Prerequisite: Not open for credit to students who have completed English 1 or Writing 1E, or 1LK.
Writing 1 welcomes students into the university, acclimates them to the academic community, and bolsters their writing, reading, and critical thinking. Students read and analyze university-level texts, write essays of increasing complexity, and practice stages of the composing process. This introductory writing course, which satisfies the Entry Level Writing Requirement, develops the strategies and intellectual activities necessary to achieve proficiency in future writing classes and enable students to enter Writing 2 as well as courses across the curriculum.

Writing 1E. Approaches to University Writing for Engineers

4 units
Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the College of Engineering.
Writing 1E satisfies the Entry Level Writing Requirement and focuses on academic writing. Students engage in critical reading, writing, and analysis strategies; exercises are taught through technology and engineering content and include a consideration of ethics within the world of engineering.
 

Writing 2. Academic Writing

4 units
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement . Not open for credit to students who have completed English 2 or Writing 2LK or 2E.
Writing 2 is students' initiation to the foundations of academic writing in the university. The work occurs in a small classroom setting where teachers interact intensively and creatively with students. Students receive feedback on writing, learn strategies for engaging in critical inquiry, explore multiple genres, and develop their writing processes. After successfully completing Writing 2, students will have developed critical writing, reading, and analysis strategies that they can use in upper-division classes in the Writing Program and the university. Writing 2 satisfies the Area A1 requirement.

Writing 2E. Academic Writing for Engineers

4 units
Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the College of Engineering.
In addition to the above goals of Writing 2, Writing 2E introduces students to engineering writing genres, such as memos, researched technical reports, collaborative work, and multi-media presentations.

Writing 2LK. Academic Writing

4 units
Prerequisites: Co-enrollment in linked companion course.
This course is taught in conjunction with a specified companion course. Readings and assignments are related to the subject matter of the companion.
 

Writing 50. Writing and the Research Process

4 units
Note: Not open to seniors
Prerequisite: Writing 2, 2E, 2LK, or equivalent. Not open for credit to students who have completed English 3 or Writing 50LK or 50E.
Students in Writing 50 propose, research, and write an independent research project relating to the theme of the course. Completion of Writing 2 or its equivalent is required. Writing 50 fulfills the Area A2 requirement and prepares students for writing longer research papers and developing strong research and synthesis skills. Writing 50 expands and further validates academic inquiry as a personal, professional, and community practice.

50E. Writing and the Research Process for Engineers

4 units
Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the College of Engineering.
Writing 50E, the final course in the sequence, prepares students for the profession of engineering through a focus on collaborative research and teamwork.

 

UPPER DIVISION

Writing 105

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 2 or 2E or 2LK; upper-division standing.
Writing 105 courses complement the Writing Program's other upper-division courses by offering interdisciplinary alternatives and fulfill the Area A2 requirement. In Writing 105 courses, the material spans several disciplines or areas. For example, Writing 105M (Multimedia Writing) draws on work done in Film and Media Studies, Art History, English, Computer Science, and other disciplines; 105R (Writing and Rhetoric) includes work from Political Science, Philosophy, Education, Communication, and other disciplines; Writing 105C (Creative Nonfiction) synthesizes skills and approaches from Humanities-based disciplines--especially English and Comparative Literature--and a range of social science concentrations. 105 classes encourage sophisticated analysis, in depth reading, writing and critical thinking and awareness of how the specific subjects of these classes can be situated across various disciplines.

Writing 105C. Creative Nonfiction

Course in creative nonfiction, a prose form whose practitioners consciously merge elements of traditional fiction and nonfiction. Students get extensive practice in reading and composing within this genre.

Writing 105CW: Writing in Community

Analysis and practice of various forms of community-based writing (such as reports and proposals) by and for local groups that promote the social good. Attention is paid to direct interaction with the community, research, metacognitive awareness, genre awareness, and writing conventions.

Writing 105G. Grammar and Stylistics

Focuses on grammar and stylistics for professional writers and editors. The emphasis is practical and analytical, attending to issues of sentence structure and diction, and on the diversity of styles, formats, and audiences.

Writing 105M. Multimedia Writing

Focuses on new modes of writing and publishing enabled by computer technology. Projects involve analyzing, creating, reading about, and reflecting on writing in new media. Students create works suitable for web or other digital formats.

Writing 105P. Writing and Philosophies of Language

Introduction to theories of language and communication, with concentration on linguistic structure and the conditions through which meaning is produced and transmitted in communication situations. Students reflect on writing, and produce written research, in a related area of inquiry.

Writing 105PD. Writing for Public Discourse

Introduction to writing and public discourse in local, regional, national, and global contexts through analysis of writing in civic contexts, political activism, and public policy. Students reflect on, and produce written research in a related area of inquiry.

Writing 105PS. Writing for Public Speaking

Analysis and practice of writing, researching, and delivering oral presentations including speech scripts, visual aids, and various related documents. Typical formats include extemporaneous speech and impromptu address for specific audiences and purposes.

Writing105R. Rhetoric and Writing

Traces the history, theory and practice of rhetoric (effective persuasion) from classical times to the modern era. Students analyze key works and apply rhetorical strategies in written argumentation.

Writing 105S. Writing About Sustainability

Analysis and practice of various forms of writing that address sustainability in interdisciplinary contexts. Students will research, write, and reflect on concepts and practices of sustainability, examining the role of words and images in communicating sustainability ideas to diverse audiences.

Writing 105SW. Science Writing for the Public

Focus on analyzing, practicing, and applying strategies for communicating scientific concepts, research projects, and findings with non-specialist audiences. Students will employ both traditional and new media forms of communicating scientific knowledge.

Writing 105WE. Writing and Ethics

Focus on ethics in writing, rhetoric, and communication. By researching, analyzind, and composing texts related to ethics in various genres and disciplines, students explore how writing contributes to the good life for individuals and communities.

Writing 107

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 2 or 2E or 2LK; upper-division standing.
Writing 107 courses focus on writing in a professional or workplace setting in a variety of specific arenas and fulfill the Area A2 requirement in writing. Representative courses focus on writing for business in the US and abroad, writing for high tech, journalism, and law. The 107 courses are geared to students who intend to enter the workforce after graduation or who plan to pursue graduate school in a specific profession.

Writing 107A. Writing for Accounting

Note: formerly Writing 109AC
Prerequisites: Economics 136A (may be taken concurrently). Writing practices in academic and professional accounting. Research sources include publications, databases, case studies, interviews. Assignments include reports, correspondence, memorandum, presentations. Attention to critical thinking, research techniques, international context, use of information technology, and visual communications.

Writing 107B. Business and Administrative Writing

Note: formerly Writing 109EC
Analysis and practice in business genres that focus on writing strategy, concise style, and visual aspects of communication. Attention to typical documents such as letters, memos, e-mail, proposals, and collaborative reports.

Writing 107EP. Writing for Environmental Professions

Note: formerly 109ES
Analysis and practice of professional writing used in addressing environmental topics such as water management, carbon neutrality, and sustainability. Attention to research methods, audience analysis, document design, conciseness, collaboration, and editing strategies.

Writing 107G. Professional Writing for Global Careers

Note: formerly Writing 109GS
Analysis and practice of writing in global contexts related to business, government, and non-governmental organizations. Attention to documents such as letters, emails, proposals, and various collaborative reports. Emphasis on linguistic and cross-cultural factors affecting international research and document design.

Writing 107J. Journalism and News Writing

Note: formerly Writing 109JW
Analysis and practice of news writing for print and broadcast with focus on inverted pyramid style, interview techniques, background research, editing, writing to deadline, and ethical issues.

Writing 107L. Legal Writing

Note: formerly Writing 109L
Practice in applying rules to facts, analyzing issues, and writing clearly, succinctly, and cogently in various forms of legal discourse such as case briefs, law essays, letters, short office memoranda, and appellate briefs. Fundamentals of legal research are touched upon.

Writing 107M. Magazine Writing for Publication

Focuses on writing interviews, reviews, and general articles for print media, and submitting them for publication. Students learn about audiences and the demands of each genre, as well as editing and the tyranny of deadlines.

Writing 107P. Writing for Public Relations

Analysis and practice of writing in the field of public relations with focus on the news release, brochure, media kit contents, social media, and newsletters.

Writing 107T. Technical Writing

Analysis and practice in writing for technology users with attention given to task analysis, design principles, and writing strategies. Projects include technology related documents such as instructions, user manuals, online documentation, and web content. Final documents suitable for professional portfolio.

Writing 107WC. Writing Web Content

Analysis and practice of writing for digital environments with focus on content commonly used in professional settings including websites, blogs, email newsletters, and social media.

Writing 109

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 2 or 2E or 2LK; upper-division standing.
Writing 109-sequence courses, which fulfill the Area A2 requirement, serve students by helping them to develop and refine academic writing styles appropriate to various disciplines and their discourse communities. Students learn to write effectively within specific genres and social contexts by focusing on specialized writing in various genres and fields. Students also conduct a significant, independent project, drawing on primary and/or secondary sources from a range of resources, including specialized professional journals, databases, websites, and other pertinent literature. Finally, students develop familiarity with general disciplinary activities and responsibilities through exposure to genres, forms and paradigms characteristic of those disciplines.

Writing 109CS. Writing for Chicana/o Studies

Analysis and practice of various forms of writing and research methods in Chicana/o Studies. Attention to strategies for argumentation, analysis, organization, and documentation used in humanities and social sciences.

Writing 109ED. Writing for the Teaching Professions

Research, discussion, and analysis of current issues in educational theory, practice, and policy. Appropriate for prospective credential students.

Writing 109F. Writing about Film

Analysis and practice of various forms of writing for film, including argumentative writing, film reviews, and essays. Of special interest to majors in film studies, English, and social sciences.

Writing 109HP. Writing for Health Professionals

Strategy, analysis, format for various types of academic and professional writing in the health care field. Contemporary topics/issues will be the basis of study, discussion, research, and writing.

Writing 109HU. Writing for the Humanities

Analysis of various forms of writing for the humanities, both academic and professional. Attention to modes and methods of argumentation, research methods, design of papers, stylistic clarity, and editing strategies.

Writing 109SS. Writing for the Social Sciences

Analysis and practice of various research methods and forms of writing in the social sciences including qualitative/ethnographic, quantitative, interpretive, and theoretical. Writing projects such as literature reviews, proposals, case studies, scientific reports, interviews. Attention to disciplinary resources, formal conventions, graphics, and style.

Writing 109ST. Writing for Science and Technology

Analysis and practice of various forms of scientific and technical writing, both academic and professional, such as reports, proposals, journal articles, and abstracts. Attention to research methods, design of papers, development of graphics, technical style, and editing strategies.

Writing 109V. Writing for the Visual Arts

Analysis and practice of various forms of writing for the visual arts, including reviews of film and art shows, grant proposals, and professional resumes. Of special interest to majors in the arts.

Writing 109WS. Writing for Women's Studies/Gender Studies

Analysis and practice of various forms of writing and research methods in women's studies. Attention to strategies for argumentation, analysis, organization, and documentation used in humanities and social sciences. Writing projects incorporate interdisciplinary and multimedia sources.
 

Writing 125. Special Topics in Academic and Professional Writing

2-4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 2, 2E, or 2LK; and Writing 50, 50E, or 50LK or 109AA-ZZ, or English 10; upper-division standing.
Directed group reading, writing, and discussion of specialized topics such as manuscript preparation, editing of tables and figures, and writing of multimedia materials.
 

Writing 150. Internship in Writing

2-4 units
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor. Course required for credit in the minor.
Fieldwork experience and weekly seminar.
 

Writing 151A. Copyediting

4 units
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Develop expertise in the principles of grammar, punctuation, and copyediting. Application of these principles to a wide range of professional documents. Create style guides and notes to the author—to provide advice to authors on issues of clarity and ambiguity—to supplement the copyedited work. 

Writing 151B. Style and Usage

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 151A; consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Editing of professional work, including best-selling nonfiction and fiction, with an emphasis on issues of style and usage. Collaborative magazine project—imagined, written, and edited solely by group members. The course concludes with collaborative presentations and a final print or online portfolio of student work.

Writing 153A. Civic Engagement and Public Writing

4 units
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Focus on defining civic engagement, its forms and genres. Students explore intersections between individual agency and civic issues with an emphasis on public writing.  Assignments involve the study and practice of writing by civically engaged citizens.  

Writing 153B. Writing for Civic Organizations

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 153A; consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Focus on the writing genres that advance the civic purpose of organizations. Students study and produce print and multi-media documents to meet the needs of civic organizations in management, marketing, public relations, and fundraising.

Writing 155A. Document Design and Production

4 units
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Information design in print media; focus on grammatical and rhetorical expertise. Projects include flyers, brochures, resumes, and other graphics, with a focus on understanding the intersections of writing and visual design. Project-based course culminating in print portfolio. 

Writing 155B. Digital Portfolio

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 155A; consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Creation of digital work using software and coding. The major project is the design and production of a professional website, using HTML, CSS, JavaScript, WordPress, and other tools. Focus on developing effective design and communication skills within a digital environment. 

Writing 157A. Business Communication for Client Projects

4 units
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Development of written, visual, and oral skills for workplace organizations (business, government, or non-profit). Through a client-based project, students will develop collaborative writing and project management skills, along with professional genres such as status reports, promotional plans, and news releases.

Writing 157B. Strategic Business Communication

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 157A; consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Through guest speakers, readings, and case study discussions, students will explore business communication strategy in reputation management, corporate social responsibility, crisis communication, and external/internal communication.  Students will prepare a variety of professional genres for their final print portfolio and website. 

Writing 159A. Scientific Literacy

4 units
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
First capstone course for the Science Communication track of the Professional Writing minor. Focus on developing scientific literacy, including abilities to historically situate, interpret, critique, and compose professional STEM genres. Project-based course culminating in document portfolio.
 

Writing 159B. Science Communication for the Public

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 159A; consent of instructor; enrollment in the Professional Writing Minor.
Second capstone course for the Science Communication track of the Professional Writing minor. Focus on critiquing and composing scientific content for nonspecialist and public audiences, using various genres, media, modes, and technologies. Project-based course culminating in document portfolio.

Writing 160. Theory and Practice of Writing Center Consulting

4 units
Prerequisites: Writing 2 or 2E or 2LK
Please note: Writing 160 fulfills the writing intensive requirement in the College of Letters and Science. It does not fulfill the Area A2 requirement.

Focuses on theory and practice of writing center consulting work. The course will cover basic practices for working with student writing and writers; theories of writing and of tutoring; special considerations for multilingual writers; working with students labeled “basic writers”; online tutoring; and more. 
 

Writing 199. Independent Studies in Writing

1-5 units
Prerequisites: Open to students who (1) have attained upper-division standing; (2) have at least a 3.0 gradepoint average for the preceding three quarters; (3) satisfied Area A requirements; and (4) consent of instructor. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. Writing 199 may be repeated for a maximum of 10 units.
Writing, reading, and conference with specialized research or focus topic.
 

Writing 199RA. Independent Research Assistance in Writing

1-5 units
Prerequisites: Open to students who (1) have attained upper-division standing; (2) have at least a 3.0 gradepoint average for the preceding three quarters; (3) satisfied Area A requirements; and (4) consent of instructor. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. Writing 199RA may be repeated for a maximum of 10 units.
Faculty-supervised research assistance.
 

GRADUATE COURSES

Writing 250. Seminar in the Teaching of Academic Writing

2 units
Same course as interdisciplinary 250.
Instruction in methods of teaching academic writing to undergraduates. Topics include syllabus, desgin, sequencing or assignments, grading, and teaching students to master disciplinary conventions. Lecture plus laboratory.
 

Writing 251. Academic Research Writing

2 units
Same course as interdisciplinary 251.
Instruction in the writing of graduate academic documents, including proposals, theses, course papers, articles for publication, and C.V.'s. Emphasis on writing clearly and mastering disciplinary conventions. Lecture plus laboratory.
 

Writing 252. Teaching Technical Communication

4 units
Prerequisites: graduate standing consent of instructor
Offers graduate students a theoretical and pedagogical foundation for teaching introductory courses in technical communication, and in particular, UCSB's writing courses for freshman engineering majors.
 

Writing 500. Directed Teaching

4 units
Prerequisites: Appointment as teaching assistant or associate. Yields no unit credit for advanced degrees.
Teaching assistants must register during quarter of service for this course of supervision and instruction.
 

Writing 501. Academic Writing: Theory and Practice

4 units
Prerequisite: application submitted for Writing Program TA appointment
Preparatory orientation and concurrent training for newly appointed Writing Program teaching assistants. Topics include theories of composition pedagogy, academic literacies, principles of instructional design and curriculum development, effective classroom practices, and assessment of student writing.

Writing 502A-C. Seminar in Professional Editing

1 units

A three-quarter course sequence that immerses students in the theory, methods, and issues of Writing Studies. Serves as a foundation for additional emphasis courses.

Writing 596. Directed Reading and Research

1-4 units
Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor.
May be repeated for credit as determined by department chair.
Group or individual tutorial.