NOTE:  ROOM ASSIGNMENTS ARE TENTATIVE, BUT PRESENTATION TIMES WILL NOT CHANGE .

 

PLEASE CHECK THE PRINTED PROGRAM WHEN YOU ARRIVE AT THE CONFERENCE TO ENSURE THAT YOUR ROOM HAS NOT BEEN CHANGED.

 

Writing Research Across Borders

Conference Schedule

February 22 Friday Sessions

8:30 am -- Registration & Coffee in the University Center Lagoon Plaza

 

8:30 am - 1:00 pm -- Snacks & coffee available in the University Center Lagoon Plaza

A Session:  Friday 9:30-10:45

Conference OpeningWelcome:

Chancellor Henry Yang, U.C. Santa Barbara

Dean Jane Close Conoley, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at U.C. Santa Barbara

Plenary Session: The transformation of children’s knowledge of language units during beginning and initial literacy

Chair:  Charles Bazerman

 

Emilia Ferreiro, National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico

 

Room: Corwin Pavilion, University CenterDuring literacy development, children acquire new knowledge about language (usually called “metalinguistic awareness”). In particular, they learn to transform oral language, which they usually master as a tool of social communication, into an object of inspection and inquiry (in epistemological terms).

 

A literate adult speaker can segment the flow of speech into units at various levels. Some of these units are of linguistic interest. Which units are available before and during beginning literacy (ages three to five)? Which units are acquired during initial literacy, when formal instruction usually begins (ages six to seven)? Do these units evolve?

 

Children’s written productions will be used to focus on three main units:

 

a) The word as a conceptual unit and the word as a graphic unit. The theoretical status of this unit is controversial but its psychological status is very strong. In AWS (alphabetical writing systems), the “word” unit has peculiar relevance. (A string of letters separated from other strings by empty spaces is considered to be a single word.)

 

b) The syllable is a strong psycholinguistic unit (“The shortest bits of speech that people recognize ‘automatically’ are syllables” – P.Daniels, 2006). However, the syllable is not marked as such in AWS. Linguistic interest in this unit is growing.

 

c) The phoneme is without doubt the most important of the theoretical units. AWS are often regarded as a mapping of phonemes into letters. However, many inconsistencies are evident in the so-called “deep orthographies” (English, for instance) as well as in “shallow orthographies” (Spanish, for instance). Spontaneous awareness of phonemes seems out of reach (or at least very problematic) before literacy in an alphabetical writing system is acquired.

 

These three units will be inspected through the interpretation of data. The dominant view in English-speaking countries is a unidirectional path depicted as: oral --> written path (i.e., the units must be recognized orally in order to be applied to the written material). The current presentation will emphasize the need to consider an interactive oral <---> written path, while also taking into account a possible written --> oral path. In doing so, a sharp dichotomy between reading and writing will be considered as an obstacle to our understanding of literacy development as conceptual development.

 

Room: University Center Corwin Pavilion

B Session:  Friday 11:00 –12:00

Plenary Session: The yummy yummy case:  Learning to write – Observing readers and writers 

 

Chair:  Chris Thaiss, U.C. Davis

 

Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

 

with

Martine Braaksma, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Marleen Kieft, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Michel Couzijn, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Tanja Janssen, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Mariet Raedts, Ghent Polytechnics for Translation & Interpreting, Belgium

Elke Van Steendam, Antwerp University, Belgium

Talita Groenendijk, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Anne Toorenaar, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Huub van ven Berg, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands and Utrecht University, the Netherlands

 

The Yummy Yummy Case is a short lesson series of four lessons, where students (Grade 7) learn to write a letter of complaint, without any instruction but with significant student progression. The students function in a community of learners, creating and participating in relevant learning experiences in writing, reading and talking. The teacher scaffolded a series of experiences that helped students learn inductively. In the presentation, we will follow the teacher’s path of reasoning when creating the lesson series.

 

In this series of lessons students write, act as readers, observe readers, abstract qualities of effective texts, and revise their first versions. We will present some film clips showing the students at work, their processes, and their texts.

 

Finally we will present the highlights of other studies on the effects of observation as a learning activity in writing. These learning activities vary from observing readers to experiencing the effect of the text the learner wrote, to observing learners doing writing tasks instead of doing these tasks themselves: in some cases students were learning to write without writing. Genres involved are argumentative letters, written instructions, argumentative essays, synthesis texts,

and letters of application. Participants involved are students from ages varying from 12-19, in the Netherlands these students were in grade 7 through freshmen in business school.

 

Room: University Center Corwin Pavilion

Gert Rijlarsdam,  University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

with Martine Braaksma, Marleen Kieft, Michel Couzijn, Tanja Janssen, Mariet Raedts, Elke Van Steendam, Talita Groenendijk, Anne Toorenaar, and Huub Van Den Berg

 

Room:  Corwin Pavilion, University Center

Lunch 12:00-1:00

Boxed lunches provided in the University Center Lagoon Plaza

 

C Session:  Friday 1:00-2:00

Plenary Session: Writing in multiple contexts: Vygotskian CHAT meets the phenomenology of genre Writing research in international perspective: Texts, contexts, and generalizability

 

Chair:  Sue McLeod, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

David Russell, Iowa State University

 

Room:  Corwin Pavilion, University Center

 

Texts largely structure the activity of the modern world and--a forteriori--the post-modern world, with its reliance on hypertextual networks. But they do so always in contexts-often in multiple contexts. Texts are given life through activity, through contexts of use. And to study them without studying their contexts (as has often been the case) is to separate writing from its very being. Yet the problem of theorizing context and context-and of operationalizing the theory in empirical research--is one of the thorniest but most important in writing studies. Socio-cultural theories of literacy using Vygotsky and genre theory have been developed in the last 25 years in North America research and applied in a number of fields: primarily organizational (business, technical, and scientific) communication and education (Bazerman & Russell, 2003).

 

In this paper I sketch out elements of a theory of multiple contexts based on a synthesis of Vygotskian cultural-historical activity theory (growing out of his notion of tool mediation) with a theory of genre as social action (Miller, 1984, 1994) (growing out of Alfred Schutz's phenomenology). The relationship between CHAT and genre as social action has been developed in various ways by many North American writing researchers to provide a principled way of analyzing written texts in their human contexts. I will illustrate my approach to this synthesis with examples from my group's research on higher education and workplace pedagogy: studies of the genre systems of history for undergraduates, and studies of online multimedia simulations we developed to represent engineers' communicative activity within and between complex organizations.

 

Room: University Center Corwin Pavilion

Break:  2:00-2:30

Snacks available in the Phelps Courtyard

 

Book Exhibit opens in Phelps 1172

D Sessions:  Friday 2:30-4:00

 

Book Exhibit Opens in Phelps 1172

D11.) International Changes changes in Largelarge-scale Writing writing Assessmentsassessments: Approaches for Studying studying the Effects effects of Globalglobal, Economic economic and Institutional institutional Forcesforces

Chair:  John Catalini, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Towards Making Cross-System Comparisons of Writing for Assessment

Rob Oliver, University of London


The Machine machine in the Gardengarden: Economic and Global global Pressures pressures to Homogenize homogenize Machine machine and Human human Writing writing Assessmentassessment

Les Perelman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 
The Politics politics of Assessmentassessment: Comparability and Differencedifference

Anne Herrington, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

 

National Writing Project's Analytic Writing Continuum and Scoring Conference

 

Sherry Swain, National Writing Project

 

 

Room: Buchanan 1910

D2) . Second language writing processes 

Writing in L1 and L2: A closer look at the relationship between cognitive activities and text quality

 

Daphne van Weijen, Utrecht University

Huub van den Bergh, Utrecht University, University of Amsterdam

Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam

Ted Sanders, Utrecht University

 

The use of the first language in written composing processes in SL in a language contact context

Oriol Guasch, Universitat Autėnoma de Barcelona

 

Language difference, error, and writing across borders

Bruce Horner, University of Louisville

Min-Zhan Lu, University of Louisville

 

 

 

Room: South Hall 1431

D3.) Diversity research and teaching for change

Chair:  Mysti Rudd, Lamar State College – Port Arthur

 

Kathryn Ortiz, University of Arizona, Tucson

Vivette Milson-Whyte, University of Arizona, Tucson

Katia Mello Vieira, University of Arizona, Tucson

Aja Y. Martinez, University of Arizona, Tucson

 

Room:  University Center Mission Room

D44.) Cancelled

D5.5) Alternate writing modalities and literate communities

Analyzing Genentech’s quarterly earnings reports as multimodal compositions

Carl Whithaus, University of California, Davis

 

Readers becoming writers: Fan fiction and online communities

Claudia Rebaza, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 

Room: Phelps 2536

D66.) Writing as public practice

The Status status of Writingwriting

Deborah Brandt, University of Wisconsin -- -Madison

 

Writing and research in the new public, performative paradigm: The problem of tracking transformation

Linda Flower, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Room:  University Center Corwin PavilionUniversity Center Corwin Pavilion

D7.) Redefining community literacy borders

Unfinished business

Rhea Estelle Lathan, Michigan State University

 

Researching family literacy histories

Julie Lindquist, Michigan State University

Bump Halbritter, Michigan State University

 

Room: Phelps 1425

D88.) Researching transfer of writing across situation, time, medium, and genre

Chair: Erin Krampetz, Escuela Nueva International    

 

Anis Bawarshi, University of Washington

Kirsten Benson, University of Tennessee

Bill Doyle, University of Tennessee

Jenn Fishman, University of Tennessee

Stacey Pigg, Michigan State University

Mary Jo Reiff, University of Tennessee

 

Room: University Center Harbor Room

D9.) New schools, new curricula: Literacy advances in basic international education

Chair: Denise Sauerteig, Escuela Nueva International Escuela Nueva International  

Respondent: Karen Boyd, Escuela Nueva International

 

Erin Krampetz, Escuela Nueva International

Sandra Staklis, Escuela Nueva International

Clare Hanbury, Escuela Nueva International

Johnny Lin, Brown University

David Suarez, University of Southern California

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

D100.) National research traditions in international contexts

Chair:  Yully C. Nieves, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Mapping genre researches in Brazil: An exploratory study

Antonia Dilamar Araújo, Universidade Estadual do Ceará (UECE), Brazil

 

Writing studies: Definition(s) and issues / La rédactologie: Definition(s) et enjeux

Céline Beaudet, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada

 

Modern ‘Writingology’ in China

Chen Huijun Chen, China University of Geological Sciences, Beijing, Chinaand U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room: South Hall 1432

D111.) business Professional writing in and the university

Re-languaging: Professional writing across languages and cultures

Penny Kinnear, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Canada

 

Responding to accreditation pressure:  An assessment structure to evaluate business student writing

Scott Warnock Drexel University

Frank Linnehan, Drexel University

 

A case study of writing in a particular subject at a Chilean University: Issues and challenges

Mónica Tapia Ladino, Universidad Católica de la Ssma. Concepción, Chile

 

Room: Phelps 2524

D12.) Sharing research

Researching across borders – the “interdisciplinary web portal: Text production and writing research”

Eva-Maria Jakobs, Institute of Linguistics and Communication Science, Germany

Matthias Knopp, Institute of Linguistics and Communication Science, Germany

 

The visibility of writing:  An analysis of the academic poster

Angela Paiva Dionísio, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco – Brazil

 

Writing research across disciplinary borders:  'Chalk talk' as the principle principal genre of teaching university mathematics

Natasha Artemeva, Carleton University

Janna Fox, Carleton University

 

Room: Phelps 2516

D133.) past, present, and future of scholarly writing

Why German students must write (and how): Tracing the roots of German writing pedagogy back to Humboldt’s reform of higher education in Prussia: A historical reconstruction

Otto Kruse, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland

 

Anti-realism for academic writing and the dimension of self-monitoring

Magnus Gustafsson, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden

Andreas Eriksson, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden

 

Scientific argumentation in distributed systems of publication

Karen Lunsford, U. C. Santa Barbara

 

Room: Phelps 1260

D14.) The high school/college border: Findings and provocations from year one of the University of Denver longitudinal study of undergraduate writing

Doug Hesse, University of Denver

Eliana Schonberg, University of Denver

Jennifer Campbell, University of Denver

Richard Colby, University of Denver

Rebekah Shultz Colby, University of Denver

 

Room: University Center Lobero Room

D15.) Developing “writing-enriched degrees” at a large research institution

Pamela Flash, University of Minnesota

Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch, University of Minnesota

Maggie Van Norman, University of Minnesota

Elizabeth M Kalbfleisch, University of Minnesota

 

Room: South Hall 1430

E Sessions:  Friday 4:15-5:45

E1.) Bilinguality in and far from the borderlands

 

Positionality, mestizaje, and Tejano/a? counter discourse

Nancy Nelson, Texas A&M University -- -Corpus Christi

Estanislado Barrera, IV, Texas A&M University- -- Corpus Christi

Kim Skinner, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

 

An account of writing strategies for the development of professional competences

of modern language teaching students: Spanish and English

Margarita Ulloa T, University of Bio-Bio, Chile

José Gabriel Brauchy, Catholic University of the Holy Conception, Chile

 

Room: Phelps 2516

E22.) Strategies for second-language learners Roots of reluctance: Dictionary use among non-native English speakers in a graduate electrical-engineering programs

Roots of reluctance: Dictionary use among non-native English speakers in a graduate electrical-engineering programs

Linda Dailey Paulson, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Qualitative changes in the reading-writing connection

Myshie Pagel, El Paso Community College, University of Texas at El Paso

Roselia Galindo, El Paso Community College

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

E3.) Engaging middle school students (ages 11-14)

Genre selection, student motivation and construction of student identity: Middle  

student identity:  Middle school students writing in Social Studies

Kevin A. Hooge, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Persuading peasants and writing a five-paragraph essay:  Genre and intertextuality in middle school social studies writing

George C. Bunch, Ph.D., U.C. Santa Cruz

Kara Willett, U.C. Santa Cruz

 

Room: Buchanan 1930

E4.) Factors leading to student success

 

Reading during writing: Using eye tracking to examine relationships between reading patterns and text quality

Scott F. Beers, Seattle Pacific University

Tom Thomas Quinlan, Educational Testing Service

 

Linking domain and situated motivation for writing with writing performance and experiences

Gary Troia, Michigan State University

Rebecca Shankland, Michigan State University

Kimberly Wolbers, University of Tennessee

 

Self-regulated strategy development for writing: What is needed next

Karen R. Harris, Vanderbilt University

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

E5.) Multimodal writing identities

Chair: Mary M. Juzwik 

 

Mediated identity: One writer’s use of written language to bridge the “communicative

the “communicative canyon” of [his] autism”

Christine Dawson, Michigan State University

 

Collaborative identity: One teacher/writer participating in a National Writing Project

National Writing Project summer institute

Jim Fredricksen, Michigan State University

 

Analytic identity: One doctoral student's development of internally persuasive discourse

Ann M. Lawrence, Michigan State University

 

Room:  University Center Lobero Room

E6.) Material experience, visual displays, and learning environments

Chair:  Doug Bradley, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Displays of knowledge: Text production and media reproduction in liquid crystal research

Chad Wickman, Kent State University

 

Writing research in mixed reality: Tools and methods for exploration

James K. Ford, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Stretching beyond borders: The multiple discourses of an anatomy laboratory and at an urban zoo

Carol Berkenkotter, University of Minnesota

T. Kenny Fountain, University of Minnesota

Zoe Nyssa, University of Minnesota

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

E7.) Making meaning: Authors, genres, and audiences

Do texts need an author? Production of text between constraints and freedom

Sylvie Plane, IUF de Paris, France

 

Playing with genre(s) as a meaningful writing activity

Pietro Boscolo, University of Padova, Italy

 

Sociocultural environments and control of narrative tools at French pupils ranging from 9 to 14 years

Christina Romain, I.U.F.M. Académie Aix-Marseille, France

 

Room:  University Center Corwin Pavilion

E8.) Patterns, methods, and contexts: Case results from a longitudinal study of writing highlighting results from a five-year longitudinal study of college writing

Presenters provide an in-depth view of student writing development both in and out of college and in national and international contexts

 

Chair: Dr. Andrea A. Lunsford, Stanford University

Respondent: Jenn Fishman, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

 

International perspectives: Writing across cultures and contexts 

Erin Krampetz, Escuela Nueva International

 

From data to findings: Coherence, contradiction, and cases in the study of writing development

Paul Rogers, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

From college freshman to classroom teacher: A case study of five years in writing development

Laurie Stapleton, Stanford University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

E9.) Results from the National Survey of Student Engagement

Writing’s relationship with highly valued educational activities and outcomes: Correlation

Correlation studies of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement

Paul V. Anderson, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

 

The catalytic role of writing within student engagement:  Causal modeling of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement

Robert M. Gonyea, Indiana University

 

Institutional uses of the results of analyses of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement

Denise Krallman, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

 

Room:  Phelps 1425

E10.) Preparing pre-service and In-service teachers of writing across the curriculum

Interdisciplinary conversations on bringing students into a community of writers

Janine Utell, Widener University

Patricia Dyer, Widener University

Rachel Batch, Widener University

David Coughlin, Widener University

 

Writing in subject specific contexts: Examples from Norwegian secondary education

FrŅydis Hertzberg, University of Oslo, Norway

Anne Kristine Įgreid, University College, Norway

Research on the teaching and learning of writing in Portugal: The case of a research group

Luísa Álvares Pereira

Aleixo Conceićčo

Maria Inźs Cardoso

Luciana Graća

Mariana Pinto, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugual

 

 

 

Room:  Phelps 3526

E11.) Exploring the kairos of writing program assessment

Nicole B. Wallack, Columbia University

Alfred E. Guy Jr., Yale College Writing Center

 

Room:  University Center Mission Room

E12.) Uses and abuses of sources in research writing

Causes of student plagiarism

Robert Lankamp , University of Leiden, The the Netherlands

 

Step into my scenarios: Student identification in issues of ownership

Kalo Clarke, Northeastern University, Boston

Lynn Dornink, Northeastern University, Boston

 

An interview-based study of the functions of citations in academic writing across two disciplines

Nigel Harwood, University of Essex, U.K.

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

E13.) Writing in doctoral programs – Student perceptions and identities

 

The perceived difficulties of doing a doctorate: Is writing one?

Rochelle Skogen, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

 

Constructing professional identity through log-writing

Nancy Lea Eik-Nes, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

 

Room: South Hall 1432

E14.) expectations and pressures on student writing

Chair:  Deborah Kuhlmann, University of Houston, Clear Lake

 

The impact of expectations in writing for two different student populations: A longitudinal study

Margot Soven , La Salle University

 

Crossing disciplinary borders (or not): Problem-posing and transfer in first-year honors students’ writing

Jaime Lynn Longo, La Salle University

 

The company literacy:  How big business is buying the schools, the children, and

the discourse of the future

Jeffrey W. Perry, Kent State University

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

E15.) Enmeshed in a social network:  Collaborative writing in the workplace

Risk and representation:  A tumor board study

Christa B. Teston, Kent State University

 

Self-efficacy in the workplace:  The collaborative writing process of central documents within a social network system

Mary Lourdes Silva, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Content management technology and workplace writing:  Reshaping technical communication in a global age

Alison Hammerstrom Butler, San Diego State University

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

E16. The international WAC/WID mapping project: Objectives and current results

Chris Thaiss, U.C. Davis
Tara Porter, U.C. Davis
Erin Steinke, U.C. Davis
 
Room:  Buchanan 1920

Text Box: Friday Evening Reception 6:00-9:00 pm
Please join us for a wine and hors d’oeuvre reception sponsored by Bedford/St. Martins

Room: University Center Multicultural Center and Graduate Student Lounge 
(Across Corwin Plaza from Corwin Pavilion)

 

 

 

 

 


February 23 -- Friday Evening

Conference Reception

Sponsored by Bedford/St. Martins

Location TBA

6:00-9:00

Saturday Sessions

 

8:30 am -- Registration & Coffee in the Phelps Courtyard

 

All Day8:30 am- 4:40 pm – Snacks & coffee available in the Phelps Courtyard

 

All Day8:30 am- 6:00 pm – Book Exhibit in Phelps 1172

F Sessions:  Saturday 9:00-10:30

F1.) New directions in academic literacies:  Research in the UK

Networking across boundaries: Writing for learning on vocational courses 

Roz Ivanic , Lancaster University, U.K.

 

Academic literacies in a widening participation programme in London

Brian Street, King’s College, London

 

Transformative writing research: Issues of theory, method and goal

Theresa Lillis, The Open University, U.K.

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920Phelps 3526

F2.) Constructing a writing research project for EFL in higher education in Mexico

Maria Teresa Fátima Encinas Prudencio, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico

Nancy Susan Keranen, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico

Adriana Tellez, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico

Andrea Vasquéz, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico

Guadalupe Salazar, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

F3.) Toward a theory of adaptation: A case study of how students adapt prior writing knowledge to new contexts

Michael DePalma, University of New Hampshire

Jeff Ringer, University of New Hampshire

Leah Williams, University of New Hampshire

 

Room Phelps 3505

F4.) Revision and writing processes

Chair:  Patrick Ewing, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Writers’ shift between error-correcting and sentence composing

Thomas Quinlan, Educational Testing Service

Maaike Loncke, University of Ghent

MariĎlle Leijten, University of Antwerp

Luuk Van Waes, University of Antwerp

 

The effect of corrective feedback on written output in content-based language instruction

Catherine G. van Beuningen, University of Amsterdam, The the Netherlands

 

The question of inspiration: Genius, creativity, and the revision process

David Stephen ColonneCalonne, Eastern Michigan UniversityOakland University

 

Room: Phelps 2536

F5.) Personal and social and contextual transformations: The cognitive and the social in writing processes

Chair:  Mary Silva, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Interplay between cognitive and social processes in writing instruction

Linda Allal, Universite de Geneve, Switzerland

 

Social and cognitive models of writing: A Vygotskian integration

Hunter W. Stephenson, University of Houston – Clear Lake

 

Academic writing in compulsory educational institutions of the Madrid region (Spain)

Teodoro Álvarez Angulo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, EspaĖa

Isabel García Parejo, Facultad de Educación, UCM, Spain

 

 

Room: Phelps 1260

F6.)  ‘Get the English corrected’: An investigation of the relationships, meanings, and practices behind ‘proof-reading’ in four European universities

Nigel Harwood, University of Essex

Rowena Macaulay, University of Essex

Elizabeth Austin, University of Essex

Nicola Owtram, European University Institute, Florence

Joan Turner, Goldsmiths’ London

Mary Scott, Institute of Education, London

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

F7.) Cancelled

F8.) Theory and textual analysis

Historical Researchresearch, Theories theories of the Middle middle Rangerange, and Writing writing Practicepractice

Charles Bazerman, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Corpus linguistics and composition studies

Ulla Connor, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

 

Text analysis as “theory-laden” methodology:  Different questions, different approaches

Nancy Nelson, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

F9.) Researching fully online instruction:  Assessment, pedagogy, and a new theory of hybrid online learning environments on the border of the “real” and “virtual worlds”

Christopher Dean, U.C. Santa Barbara

Randi Browning, U.C. Santa Barbara

Jim Donelan, U.C. Santa Barbara

Peter Huk, U.C. Santa Barbara

Kathy Patterson, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

F10) Research on the teaF10. Cancelled

ching and learning of writing in Portugal: The case of a research group

Luísa Álvares Pereira

Aleixo Conceićčo

Inźs Cardoso

Luciana Graća

Mariana Pinto, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugual

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

F11.) Writing centres abroad

Developing academic literacy in context: a cross-national investigation

Jan Skillen, University  of Wollongong, Australia

 

The writing centre abroad: Researching its efficacy in the UK

Kathy Harrington, London Metropolitan University, U.K.

Peter O’Neill, London Metropolitan University, U.K.

 

Building bridges: The role of writing centers for L2 graduate writers

Talinn Phillips, Ohio University

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

F12.) The university as the writing curriculum

Chair:  Monica Bulger, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Training college-level writers through cognitive apprenticeship

Ronald T. Kellogg, Saint Louis University

 

What university professors in art, biology, and psychology looked for when evaluating senior-level student writing

Monica Stitt-Bergh, University of Hawai'i

 

You can take it with you: Portaging writing lessons across academia

Elizabeth Vander Lei, Calvin College

Dean Ward, Calvin College

 

Room:  University Center Corwin Pavilion

F13.) Using writing to build professional identity, knowledge and practice: Writing and learning among K-12 teachers

Chair:  Caren Converse, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Teaching writing and the professional identities of preservice teachers

Tim Dewar, SUNY New Paltz

 

Writing and professional development: Learning from teacher leaders

Linda Friedrich, National Writing Project

Tamara Mieles, National Writing Project

 

Classroom teachers as authors of the professional article

Anne Whitney, Pennsylvania State University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

F14.) Undergraduate writing in the sciences

“A structure that hints at a function”: Learning to write in a biological engineering laboratory class

Neal Lerner, MIT

 

“It’s a whole different mindset”: Perceptions of disciplinary writing among upper level zoology and civil engineering majors

Joleen Hanson, University of New Hampshire

 

To my dear and loving uncle T.C.: The challenges of assigning writing in an animal science course

Christina Saidy, Purdue University

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

F15.) What is writing now? Writing on mobile devices and in cyberspace

What is writing now?

Christina Haas, Kent State University

Pam Takayoshi, Kent State University

 

Mobile technologies, experience sampling research and composition studies

Joanne Addison, University of Colorado-Denver

 

Preparing for a cyber future: A reflection on blended learning in the college writing classroom

Marlowe Miller, U. Mass., Lowell

 

Room: Buchanan 1910

F16. Cancelled

F17. Writing across continents – Writing and research between North America and Africa

Research on the writing of U.S. and South Africa students: The discourse of liberation and equity in online and offline contexts

Arnetha F. Ball, Stanford University

Warren Liew, Stanford University

 

Intellectual and technological hospitality in an online, international, collaborative teaching and research project

Suzanne Blum Malley, Columbia College

John Ruiters, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa

 

Room: Phelps 1425

 

G Sessions:  Saturday 10:45-12:15

G1.) Chinese-speakers’ experiences with university writing in English

Chinese EFL learners' awareness in rhetorical strategy use in English writing: A case study in Taiwan

Shih-Chieh Chien, University of Cambridge, UK

 

Applying contemporary Western composition pedagogical approaches

in Chinese EFL university writing classes

Jiajia He, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

 

Writing across differences: Chinese-speaking students and college English writing

Kai-lin Wu, Tunghai University, Taiwan

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

G2. Cancelled

 

G2) Writing in adolescence: Hypertexts and contexts

Writing hypertexts: Effects on writing and knowing

Martine Braaksma, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Tanja Janssen, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

 

Writing research, adolescents, and the new mainstream

Kerry Enright Villalva

U.C. Davis

 

Pushing the boundaries of writing: The multimodal literacies of bilingual

youth radio

Deborah Romero, University of Northern Colorado

Dana Walker, University of Northern Colorado

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

G3.) Systems that augment writing processes

Observing writing and analyzing revisions with Inputlog

Luuk Van Waes, University of Antwerp, Belgium

MariĎlle Leijten, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Nico Verlinden, Karel de Grote Hogeschool Antwerpen, Belgium

 

A proactive recommendation system for writing: Helping without disrupting

Mari Carmen Puerta Melguizo, Radboud University, the Netherlands

Lou Boves, Radboud University, the Netherlands

Olga MuĖoz Ramos, Campus de Cartuja, Granada, Spain

 

 

 

 

 

Verbal reporting as an instrument of research into reading and writing processes: The case of the process log

Rachel Segev-Miller, Kibbutzim College of Education, Tel Aviv, Israel

 

Room: Phelps 2536

G4) Writing in multimedia art and design education

Research and reimagination:  Shaping writing pedagogy in an undergraduate art and design university

Jane Milton, Nova Scotia College of Art & Design University, Canada

Christina Halliday, Ontario College of Art & Design, Canada

 

Researching across disciplinary borders: What writers can learn in the architecture studio

Elizabeth G. Allan, Temple University

 

Room:  Phelps 3505

G5.5) Research and analysis among modern users and communities

How do you research an online community of writers?

Matthew Pearson, University of Wisconsin, Man on the Street

 

Writing in technological systems:  The debate over “scientific” research

Olivia Walling, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room:  Phelps 1425

G6.) Evolving genres and evolving communities

Flat CHAT? Reassembling literate activity

Paul Prior, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 

Written discourse construction in the academic environment: A dynamic vision of learning discursive genres

Anna Camps, UAB

Patricia Uribe, U. Tarapacá, Chile

 

Genres as boundary objects: Transforming knowledge between communities of practice

Catherine F. Schryer, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

G7.) Rhetorical inquiry in times of change: Why feminist methods matter

Kelly Belanger, Virginia Tech

Paul Heilker, Virginia Tech

Katrina M. Powell, Virginia Tech

Carolyn Rude, Virginia Tech

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

G8.) Directions in writing instruction and assessment

Reconceptualizing writing across disciplines in higher education

Anne Beaufort, University of Washington  --Tacoma

 

 

Truth or tale?: The efficacy of teacher-student writing conferences

Nicole M. Martin, Michigan State University

Janine L. Certo, Michigan State University

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

G9.) French didactic tradition

Defining writing in a “didactic” framework

Yves Reuter, Université Charles de Gaulle, France

 

University writing: A synthesis of French research in didactics studies

Isabelle Delcambre, Université Charles -de -Gaulle -- -Lille 3, France

 

Room:  University Center Corwin Pavilion

G10.) Testing the borders:  Researching writing in post-Soviet spaces

Footprints in the classroom: How foreign partners mediate and deploy western-style methods

Gil Harootunian, McDaniel College

 

Interpreting transformational teaching practices in Armenian writing classes:

Methodological considerations in a cross-cultural observation

Louise Wetherbee Phelps, Syracuse University

 

Education for democracy: A case study in Armenia

Sophia Kananyan

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

G11.) New directions in writing programs 

'The things they carried': A synthesis of research on transfer in college composition

composition

Kathleen Blake Yancey, Florida State University

 

What do students take with them?  A longitudinal study of a liberal arts college WAC program

Michael Sinowitz, DePauw University University of Miami

Susan Hahn, DePauw University

 

"Whose writing project is this?": Action research and Writing across the Curriculum

Lisa Emerson, Massey University, New Zealand

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

 

G12.) Shifting traditions:  Writing instruction and research on three continents

Transit Kathmandu: Writing instruction and research in Nepal’s higher education

Iswari Pandey, Syracuse University

Hom Lal Pandey, Tribhuvan University, Birendra Campus, Nepal

 

Strategies, policies and research on reading and writing in Colombian universities

Alejandro Gordillo Rodríguez, Universidad Nacional de Colombia

Blanca Yaneth González Pinzón, Universidad Nacional de Colombia

 

 

Shifting tradition: The past and future of writing research in Canada

Jennifer Clary-Lemon, University of Winnipeg, Canada

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

G13.) Academic voice: Authorities, opportunities, and constraints

Developing “authoritative” academic voices: First-year students’ writing for a disciplinary course as initiation to academic culture

Dora Panayotova, U.C. Santa Cruz

 

Writing in the ‘frame lock’: Writing across borders

Frances Kelly, University of Auckland, New Zealand

 

Which citation system did Derrida use?: The problem of poststructuralism, APA style, and writing in education research

Tim Laquintano

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

G14.) Nation(s) at risk:  Issues of freedom and diversity within the academy

Academic freedom, writing instruction, and the American academy: A nation at risk

Leanne Warshauer, Suffolk County Community College, Selden, NY

Tina Good, Suffolk County Community College, Selden, NY

 

Writing nation(s): Addressing diversity in the new European classroom

Erica Cirillo-McCarthy, University of Arizona

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

G15.) Source interaction among L2 learners

Source integration in students’ L2 writing in tertiary education

Bojana Petric, University of Essex, U.K. Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary

 

The impact of internet-based plagiarism detection services on learner awareness of

academic integrity

Işűl Günseli Kaćar, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Hale Işűk-Güler, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

G16.) Tutor training and placement

Crossing classrooms/writing center borders: Comparing two models of classroom-based writing tutoring with multicultural and non-mainstream students

Steven J. Corbett, University of Washington

 

But what difference can it make? A small-scale study of course-based peer tutoring

Dara Rossman Regaignon, Pomona College

 

The efficacy of writing tutor training: Workshop vs. course

Alison BrownBright, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

 


 

Lunch:  12:15 -1:00

Boxed lunches provided in the Phelps Courtyard

 

Special Informational Session:

Research Funding Opportunities for Writing Research at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development – National Institute of Health (NICHD -- NIH)

 

Brett Miller, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

Development

 

Phelps 1260

 

H Sessions:  Saturday 1:00-2:30

H1.) Needs of second-language writers: Overviews and contextualized applications

A synthesis of the results of basic research on second language writing:

1980 to 2005

Tony Silva, Purdue University

 

Genre interfaces:  Investigating prior and evolving genre knowledge of second language writers

Ilona Leki, University of Tennessee

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

H2.) Talk, text, and coherence 

How talk becomes text: An investigation of how talk activities support writing tasks in early years’ classrooms

Susan Jones, University of Exeter, U.K.

Debra Myhill, University of Exeter, U.K.          

 

Writing aloud: Oral rehearsal in the early years writing classroom

Susan Jones, University of Exeter, U.K.

Debra Myhill, University of Exeter, U.K.          

 

‘Don’t forget your capital letters’: an investigation into the way teachers introduce writing activities to young writers

Ros Fisher, University of Exeter, U.K.

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

H3.) Writing and special needs in higher education

Dyslexic students’ writing: what kind(s) of problem, and for whom?

Kate Chanock, La Trobe University, Australia

 

Writing and attitudes towards disabilities

Kathleen Patterson, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room:  Phelps 1425

H4.) Writing, multimedia and working memory

Writing a story text with multimedia extensions: comparing the contribution of the working memory

Vasily Tseptsov, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow

 

Content interference during text composition:  Effects of resources in working memory

Maria Chuy, Laboratory LMDC-CNRS – University of Poitiers, France

Denis Alamargot, Laboratory LMDC-CNRS – University of Poitiers, France

Jean-Michel Passerault, Laboratory LMDC-CNRS – University of Poitiers, France

 

Writing and working memory:  Verbal, visual and spatial demands of the writing processes

Thierry Olive, CNRS & Université de Poitiers, France

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

H5.) Literacies in a flat or fractured global landscape

The psycholinguistics of writing and literacy in a flat world

Alice S. Horning, Oakland University, Michigan

 

Reading and writing in an age of violence

Sanaa Makhlouf, The American University in Cairo

 

Appropriating critical spaces for counter narrative construction through international classroom exchanges

Doris Jones, American University in Cairo

Brooke Comer, American University in Cairo


Room:  Phelps 3505

H6.) Current issues in writing research

Present tense, past perfect:  Research methods graduate training in technical communication and composition/rhetoric

Rebecca Rickly, Texas Tech University

 

Interdisciplinarity and writing research: Manifest citationality trends in three primary research journals

Anthony Garrison, Kent State University

Amanda Lindsay, Kent State University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

H7.) Models for describing writing practices

Toward a dynamic conception of written production

Michel Fayol, Université Blaise Pascal & CNRS, France

 

Constructing knowledge objects in writing

David Galbraith, Centre for Educational Psychology Research, U.K

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

H8.) Assessment as a tool for student learning

Automated essay scoring feedback vs. teacher feedback:  Effects on student writing

Noreen Moore, University of Delaware

 

Homeopathic writing: The use of technological, student self-assessment strategies

Aurora Matzke, California Polytechnic University

Genesea Carter, California Polytechnic University

 

Developing reflection as a genre

Ellen Krogh, Ph.D., University of Southern Denmark

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

H9.) Global academic, and professional writing

Research writing for international audiences: Problems and prospects

John  M. Swales, University of Michigan

 

Some rhetorical and discoursive features of Spanish dental academic writing:  An exploratory study

Oscar Alberto Morales

Daniel Cassany

 

Peer review practices in engineering:  Patrolling the border between local research and public knowledge

Marty Patton, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Room:  University Center Corwin Pavilion

H10.) Expanding the borders of literacy practices 

 “At the crossroads”: South African students’ negotiation of language, home, institutional and disciplinary discourses in a time of transition

Rochelle Kapp, CHED, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Bongi Bangeni, CHED, University of Cape Town, South Africa

 

Institutional critique and research ethics:  Theorizing a “border” approach to discussions of institutional and administrative identity

Steve Lamos, University of Colorado -- -Boulder

 

The law of unintended consequences: Out-of-school literacies in sustaining and enriching social futures 

Sundy Watanabe, University of Utah

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

H11.) Environmental and sustainability writing

An evolving genre, sustainability reporting in a global setting: How and why organizations learn to write sustainability reports

LeeAnne Kryder, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Intertextuality and the social construction of argumentation in environmental discourse: The case of climate change

Graham Smart, Carleton University

 

Room:  Phelps 2524


H12.) Writing in graduate programs – Languages and genres

Mediating tools in PhD defenses: Affordances or constraints

Christine Räisänen, Chalmers University of Technology

 

Language and learning online: http://www.monash.edu.au/lls/llonline/

Writing tuition as writing research

Jan Pinder, Monash University, Australia

 

Teaching EAP writing at the graduate level: The role of first year ESL writing courses 

Hyunju Lee, Ohio State University

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

H13) Dialogism in academic argument 

“Why does “it” matter?”: The role of perception and argument in writing process of the college lab report 

Jill M. Gladstein, Swarthmore College

 

H13. Student roles and strategies across the curriculum

Three students join a community of practice and acquire an academic voice to write from: Chicano Activist Writers and their writing development

Sarah Boggs, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

 

Preparing students to write:  A case study of the role played by student questions in their quest to understand how to write in economics

Barbara Wake, University of Adelaide, Australia

 

Science-based written summarization and opinion essay-writing of academically-underprepared community college students

Dolores Perin, Teachers College, Columbia University

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

H14.) Words and gatekeeping in academic writing

Spanish scholars writing research articles in English: an intercultural analysis of the use of hedges and boosters

Pilar Mur DueĖas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

 

The social function of gate-keeeping and mentoring:  A genre analysis of moves and the use of “I” in peer-reviews of journals

Tiffany Brook

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

H15) H15. Dialogism in academic argument 

“Why does ‘it’ matter?”:  The role of perception and argument in writing processes of the college lab report

Jill M. Gladstein, Swarthmore College

 

Perceptions of persuasion: Persuasive writing, audience, and agency in contrastive fifth grade classrooms

Diane Downer Anderson, Swarthmore College

Room:  Phelps 3526

Writing across the border: Writing practices among more diverse student populations

A study of ‘international’ students’ writing: From norms to politics in a globalising academic world

Mary Scott, Institute of Education, London, UK

 

Academic writing socialization: ESL students’ border crossing across geographic and curricular spaces

Hyechong Park

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

H16.) The challenges of international collaboration

Mya Poe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Chris M. Anson, North Carolina State University

Tiane Donahue, Université de Lille III, France

Rob Oliver, University of London, U.K.

Mary Scott, University of London, U.K.

Paul Skrebels

Claire Woods

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

 

I Sessions:  Saturday 2:45-4:15

I1.) The effects of writing assessment on higher education  

Reforming undergraduate writing in higher education in Norway:  A study of change

Olga Dysthe, University of Bergen, Norway

 

Portuguese university students’ performance during written exams

José Brandčo Carvalho, University of Minho, Portugal

 

Researching the meanings of writing and literacy:  Revisiting the borders of remediation in the CSU

Mary Boland, CSU San Bernardino

Kimberly Costino, CSU San Bernardino

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

I2.) Primary students writing in a second language

Written representation of normal morphology by Chinese and Arab children learning a romance language

Liliana Tolchinsky, University of Barcelona, Spain

Joan Perera, University of Barcelona, Spain

 

Teaching writing to Dutch second language learners in primary education in Flanders

Lieve Verheyden, Centrum voor Taal en Onderwijs, Belgium

 

Cohesion in young Latino English language learners’ English narrative written text

Karren Guthrie

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

I3.) Teaching and Learning Writing with special needs students

Writing practices of a high school student with high-functioning autism

Teri Chavkin, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

A multiple strategy instructional approach for self-regulating expository reading comprehension and informative writing: A longitudinal components analysis

Linda H. Mason, Pennsylvania State University

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

I4.) It’s all in the eyes: Eye movement tracking and writing and reading processes

Eye movements during handwriting

Denis Alamargot, Université de Poitiers, France

 

Where do writers look when they pause?

Mark Torrance, Nottingham Trent University, UK

 

 

Reading during writing, in writers with and without reading and writing difficulties

Āsa Wengelin, Lund University, Sweden

Roger Johansson, Lund University, Sweden

Victoria Johansson, Lund University, Sweden

Kenneth Holmqvist, Lund University, Sweden

 

Room:  University Center Corwin Pavilion

I5.) Online learning environments 

Studying the extended writing classroom: Reflections on assessing the impact of social networking tools for writers

Mike Palmquist, Colorado State University

 

Talking through writing: An investigation into computer-mediated-communication practices among students in a hybrid classroom

Catherine F. Brooks, University of California, Riverside

 

Between peer review and peer production: Wikis, genre, and the politics of code in academe

Doreen Starke-Meyerring, McGill University, Canada

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

I6.) Writing for net work:  Glocality

When everyone is on the border: Writing for net work

Clay Spinuzzi, University of Texas Austin

 

Intersections of the local: Literate activity and digital contexts

Gail E. Hawisher, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 

Literacies in a global context: International connections

Cynthia L. Selfe, Ohio State University

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

I7.) Texts as a locus of social change

“And the winner is . . .”: The uses and limits of writing in counter demonstrations

René Agustín De los Santos, U.C. Santa BarbaraDePaul University

 

Writing, currency, and culture

Kenneth Marunowski, University of Minnesota, Duluth

 

Genre studies & social change: Studying transitional social action

Brenton Faber, Clarkson University

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

I8.) Textual analysis across borders

Chair: Huijun Chen, China University of Geosciences, Bejing and U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Researching Cultural cultural Identity identity through Literacy literacy Practicespractices: Methodological Issues issues

Susan Ghiaciuc, James Madison University

Anne-Marie Pedersen, University of Louisville

 

 

Analysis and interpretation of student texts: Complementary readings across cultures

Christiane Donahue, University of Maine, Farmington

 

 

Room:  Phelps 1425

I9.) Pedagogy and geopolitics

Cross-Cultural cultural rhetoric and intercultural communication:  U.S. and Swedish students at work

Andrea A. Lunsford, Stanford University

Alyssa O’Brien, Stanford University

Christine Alfano, Stanford University

 

Writing, from Stalinism to democracy: Language pedagogy and politics in Poland, 1945-1999

Cezar Ornatowski, San Diego State University

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

I10.) Large-scale studies of effective writing instructionCancelled

Relationships between uses of teachers’ classroom instructional time and students’ improvement in writing

George Hillocks, University of Chicago

 

Academic writing in compulsory educational institutions of the Madrid region (Spain)

Teodoro Álvarez Angulo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, EspaĖa

Isabel García Parejo, Facultad de Educación, UCM, Spain

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

I11.) Academic literacies in three countries: Argentina, Russia, and Australia

The rationale of an itinerary of research, teaching, and promotion of WAC/WID/academic literacies in Argentina

Paula Carlino, CONICET – University of Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Technical writing as a significant part of a language program at Tomsk Polytechnic University

Ludmila M. Bolsunovskaya, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia

 

How and why research writing groups work: An Australian story

Claire Aitchison, University of Western Sydney, Australia

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

I12.) Student perception, reflection, and metacognition in academic writing

Students’ perceptions of learning to write:  Similarities and difference among different student populations

Linda S. Bergmann, Purdue University

 

The stream of thought in journal writing

Işűl Günseli Kaćar, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

 

Cultural Understandings understandings of Reflective reflective Writingwriting

Nancy Hayward, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

I13.) Border crossing between private and academic literacies

A sense of place in our lives

Gesa Kirsch, Bentley College

 

 

How I learned to be an academic by reading my own archives

Liz Rohan, University of Michigan -- -Dearborn

 

 “Speaking through ink”: Exploring the interplay of private literacies and public voices

Kevin Roozen, Auburn University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

I14.) Early elementary students’ conceptions of literacy and writing

Literacy practices in Portuguese kindergartens and children’s conceptualisations about written language

Ana Isabel Santos, Universidade dos Aćores, Portugal

Margarida Alves Martins, Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Portugal

 

Approaches to writing in elementary students

Boba Samuels, University of Western Ontario

Perry D. Klein, University of Western Ontario

 

The Linguistic linguistic Basis basis of Effective effective Literacy literacy Instructioninstruction: Examination of Writing writing and Reading reading Achievement achievement in Grades grades Three three Through through Fivefive

Deborah McCutchen, University of Washington

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

I15.) Exposing invisibility: Rethinking critical pedagogy for Institutions of Higher Education

Imposed emancipation: Conflicting ideologies in a critical pedagogy curriculum

Patricia Mayes, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

 

Contriving critical consciousness:  An analysis of how students enact “empowerment”

Jennifer Kontny, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

 

Paved with good intentions: The challenge of incorporating service learning in the composition classroom

Meg Artman, Western Oregon University

 

Room:  Phelps 3505

I16.) Contingent Framingframing: Disciplinarity and Methodsmethods

Teacher Making and Literacy Narratives as Methodology

Patrick Berry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Interstitial Analogies

Rebecca Bilbro, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Crossing Ideological Boundaries in Response to Student Writing

Kory Lawson Ching, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Patrick Berry, University of Illinois

at Urbana-Champaign

Rebecca Bilbro, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Kory Lawson Ching, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

J Session:  Saturday 4:30 – 6:00

Plenary Sessionsession: Writing Research research Reference reference Booksbooks

Chair:  Karen Lunsford, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Writing research reference books

Charles MacArthur, University of Delaware

 

Research on composition, 1984-2003

Peter Smagorinsky, University of Georgia

 

A different vision of writing studies

Charles Bazerman, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room:  University Center Corwin Pavilion

February 24 Sunday Sessions

 

8:30 am -- Registration & Coffee in thein the Phelps Courtyard

 

All Day8:30 am - 4:30 pm – Snacks and coffee available in the Phelps Courtyard

 

All Day8:30 am  - 4:30 pm – Book Exhibit in Phelps 1172

 

 

K Sessions:  Sunday 9:00-10:30

K1.) Writing assessment:  Social processes and social consequences

Chair:  Kathy Patterson, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

The social consequences of writing assessment: Negotiating tensions in design

Sandy Murphy, U.C. Davis

 

Cognitively-based assessment of learning: Writing

Thomas Quinlan, Educational Testing Service

Paul Deane, Educational Testing Service

 

Exploring effective ways to assess the writing of young students

David Coker, University of Delaware

Kristen D. Ritchey, University of Delaware

Sara B. McGraw, University of Delaware

Eileen Erwin, Gesu School, Philadelphia

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

K2.) English language learners’ writing development

The role of home and school contexts in supporting literacy:  Cases of Taiwanese students

Sarah J. McCarthey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Developing biliteracy in Korean-Americans

Yeonsun Ellie Ro, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Biliterate writing development of a Korean student

Hye-Young Park, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Chinese students’ writing development within an ESL context

Xun Zheng, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

K3.) Growing into academic language:  Students’ writing development

A developmental study of referential cohesion

Audrey Mazur, Université de Lyon, France

Michel Fayol, Université Blaise Pascal, France

Harriet Jisa, Université de Lyon, France

 

Writing development and knowledge crafting

Eva Lindgren, UmeĆ University, Sweden

MariĎlle Leijten, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Luuk Van Waes, University of Antwerp, Belgium

 

Transitions from high school senior writing to college freshman writing

Jim Webber, University of New Hampshire

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

K4.) Growth from rich soil: Multimodal learning environments for young writers  

Young children’s informational writing: A multimodal perspective

Marilyn Chapman, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver

 

Learning to write in science:  Insights from young children’s multimodal informational texts

Christine C. Pappas, University of Illinois at Chicago

Maria Varelas, University of Illinois at Chicago

Tamara Ciesla, University of Illinois at Chicago

Sofia Kokkino, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Effects of a literacy curriculum that supports writing development of Spanish-speaking English learners in Head Start

Carola Matera, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room: Buchanan 1910

K5.) Crossroads in the global village:  Online internationally

Do international online collaborative projects affect ethnocentrism in students?

Diane Boehm, Saginaw Valley State U., Michigan

Herman Kurthen, Grand Valley State U., Michigan

Lilianna Aniola-Jedrzejek, Poznan U. of Technology, Poland

 

Blogging across borders:  Multimodal, conversational writing for students in Sweden and the United States

Magnus Gustafsson, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden

Donna Reiss, Clemson University

 

Art Young, Clemson University

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

K6.) Marginalized cultures within the university setting

Writing outside the lines:  Extra-curricular writing practices of Latino college students

Jessica Singer, Arizona State University

 

Impact of non-native speakers on collaborative writing projects in an undergraduate business communication course

Gina Genova, U.C. Santa Barbara

Jeff Hanson, U.C. Santa Barbara

Janet Mizrahi, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Locating discursive spaces: Self-identifying with science through academic writing among American Indian women in higher education

Carol Brandt, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

K7.) The visual dimension:  Multimodal tools to promote student interaction with texts

The impact on learning with the multimedia and multimodal social presence of the author: Results from three case studies in Social Sciences

Terry Inglese, University of Lugano, Switzerland

 

Graphical tools as a pattern language for technical writing

Lawrie Hunter , Kochi University of Technology, Japan

 

Composing across domains: Multimodal literacy in digital spaces

Aimée Knight, Michigan State UniversityPushing the boundaries of writing: The multimodal literacies of bilingual youth radio

Deborah Romero, University of Northern Colorado

Dana Walker, University of Northern Colorado

 

 

 

Room:  Phelps 3505

K8.) Ethnographies of writing: Local and global

Ethnographic writing research from a cross-national perspective

Birgitta Ramsey, Southeastern Louisiana University

 

Analyzing the extra-function of text in local music culture

 

Patrick Thomas, Kent State University

Jillian Coates, Kent State University

Christa Teston, Kent State University

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

K9.) Reflective Writingwriting: Preparing critical and professional practice

Reflective writing in service of literary writing for future teachers

Marléne LeBrun, Université de Provence, France

 

Learning to reflect

Luigina Mortari, University of Verona, Verona, Italy

 

Room:  University Center State Street Room


K10.) Effective instructional strategies

Modelling: An effective instructional strategy in collaborative revision

Elke Van Steendam, Universiteiet Antwerpen, Belgium

Gert Rijlaarsdam, Universiteit Amsterdam, The the Netherlands

Lies Sercu, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

 

Strategy-focussed writing interventions for typically-able sixth graders:  They work, but why?

Mark Torrance, Nottingham Trent University, UK

Raquel Hidalgo, León University, Spain

Patricia Robledo, León University, Spain

Jesús-Nicasio García, León University, Spain

 

Effects of sentence-combining instruction

Bruce Saddler, University at Albany- SUNY

Kristie Asaro, University at Albany- SUNY

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

K11.) Research on creativity across the curriculum

Can first year composition papers be creative, and if so, what does that mean?

Irene L. Clark, California State University, Northridge

 

To what extent can papers across the disciplines be creative and what might 'creative' mean within various disciplinary contexts?

Julie Neff, University of Puget Sound

 

Creativity in psychology research papers

Catherine Hale, University of Puget Sound

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

K12.) Histories of composition: Research and theory

The Dartmouth Conference and the geohistory of the native speaker

John Trimbur

 

Unpacking critical thinking: Seminal theory in the service of pedagogy

Cheryl Hogue Smith, California State University, Bakersfield

 

What’s the story here? Turning towards narrative in composition and rhetoric scholarship

Kathryn Comer, Ohio State University

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

K13.) Research as rhetoric: Composition faculty/librarian deep collaboration

Community-based research as a rhetorical lens for library research

Phyllis M. Ryder, George Washington University

 

A proto-disciplinary approach to first-year writing:  The comics medium as an object of student research
Phillip Troutman, George Washington University


Faculty/librarian deep collaboration

Cathy Eisenhower, George Washington University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

K144.) “Diving into the wreck”: A feminist inquiry of the dissertation in composition

Re-calling the ghosts of feminists past: How feminist dissertators have negotiated the dissertation process

Jennifer Johnson, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Diving into the recent past: Exploring the use of feminist action research in the dissertation process

Mysti Rudd, Lamar State College-Port Arthur

 

Present practices of two dissertating compositionists: Collaborating through blogs, listservs, and dissertation study groups 

Amy Lynch-Biniek

Kathleen Klompien, C.S.U. Channel Islands

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

K15) Journal of Writing Research Launch

Room:  Phelps 1425

 

L Sessions:  Sunday 10:45- 12:15

L1.) Language, perception and experience in multilingual settings

Spanish written development of prospective bilingual teachers

Barbara Merino, University of California, Davis

Laura Dubcovsky, University of California, Davis

 

EFL writings: What will teachers’ thought patterns tell you?

Jing Fu, Michigan State University

 

Diverse English uses in "ESL" writing: A grounded theory approach

Jay Jordan, University of Utah

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

L2.) Formative experiences:  Factors contributing to writing development in early childhood (2)

Associations between teacher-child relationship quality, child characteristics, and children's writing in kindergarten and first grade

Kelley L. Mayer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

What comprises development in children's writing?

Roger Beard, Institute of Education, University of London, UK

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

L33.) Research Reviews reviews on Effective effective Instructioninstruction, Multilingual multilingual Writingwriting, and Technologytechnology

Multilingual writing in preschool through twelfth grade:  The last 15 years

Steve Amendum, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

 

Jill Fitzgerald, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

 

What we know about effective writing instruction

Steve Graham, Vanderbilt University

 

The impact of technology on writing in elementary and secondary schools

Charles A. MacArthur, University of Delaware

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

L4.) Traversing the borders between high school and college writing: The influence of prior genre knowledge on students’ acquisition of new genres

Chair: Mary Jo Reiff, University of Tennessee

 

Anis Bawarshi, University of Washington

Cathryn Cabral, University of Washington

Sergio Casillas, University of Washington

Rachel Goldberg, University of Washington

Jennifer Halpin, University of Washington

Megan Kelly, University of Washington

Shannon Mondor, University of Washington

Angela Rounsaville, University of Washington

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

L5.) Models describing writing processes

Writing models for beginning and developing writers?

John R. Hayes, Carnegie Melon University

 

Cumulated deviation of a linear trend – Describing writing phases with statistical tools

Daniel Perrin, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland

Marc Welti, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland

 

The effect of errors in the text produced so far on writing strategies of professional writers

MariĎlle Leijten, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Luuk Van Waes, University of Antwerp, Belgium

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

L6.) Teachers’ approaches to implementing writing instruction and instructional reforms

Linking knowledge of students, content, and context:  Studying teachers’ approaches to teaching under-performing student writers

Judith Rivalland, Edith Cowan University, Australia

Val Faukner, Edith Cowan University, Australia

 

One program, two classrooms: An exploration of two teachers’ mediations of a form-based writing program

Suzie Y. Null, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

 

 

What teachers say they do in teaching writing: A research on the situation of the actual teaching practices in Catalonia (Spain)

Pilar Adell, Universitat Autėnoma de Barcelona, Spain

Teresa Ribas, Universitat Autėnoma de Barcelona, Spain

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

L7.) Bringing the community into the research

Border crossings in African American women’s public/professional and private literacy lives

Beverly Moss, Ohio State University

 

Speaking with one another: Avoiding the "problem of speaking for others" in community-based research

Laurie Grobman, Penn State Berks

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

L8.) Teachers’ preparation for writing instruction

Chair:  Sarah Hochstetler, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Changes in secondary English teacher preparation in writing instruction: An historical study of three teacher education programs

Sarah Hochstetler, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Open conversation:  How well are we preparing teachers to teach writing?  A study

Jessica Restaino, Montclair State University

 

Classroom-based research on effective writing instruction and perceptions of the role and efficacy of feedback

Robin Lilly, Newbury Park High School

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

L9.) Training and assessment for tutors and WAC practitioners

Research on interactions in writing center tutorials:  Crossing the hermeneutic-empirical border (2 presentations) Part 1

Jessica Clark, Christopher Newport University

Laurel D Reinking, Purdue University

 

Research on interactions in writing center tutorials:  Crossing the hermeneutic-empirical border  Part 2

Jessica Clark, Christopher Newport University

Laurel D Reinking, Purdue University

 

 

 

“Where’s the beef?”: Scoring and assessment in a grass-roots WAC partnership

with an animal sciences course

Thomas Sura, Purdue University

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

L10.) Pedagogical memory and the transferability of writing knowledge

Susan C. Jarratt, University of California, Irvine

Katherine Mack, University of California, Irvine

Alexandra Sartor, University of California, Irvine

Shevaun E. Watson, University of South Carolina

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

L11.) Transforming the doctoral degree in education:  Teaching and learning writing without borders

Chair:  Jennifer Johnson, University of California, Santa Barbara

 

Write from the start: Integrating graduate writing with diverse identities, genres, and forms

Joel Colbert, Chapman University

 

Strangers in a strange land? Welcoming ALL graduate students as future stewards of the discipline

Jan Osborn, Chapman University

 

Modeling reciprocity in learning: Faculty development through collaboration and the promotion of graduate-level research and writing instruction

Gerri McNenny, Chapman University

 

Room:  University Center State Street Room

L12.) Figures, problems, texts, and contexts: Inside and outside genres

Chair:  Clara Vaz, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Re-figuring writing studies: Whither the figurative in contemporary writing pedagogy and research?

William FitzGerald, Rutgers University Camden

 

The role of context in academic text production and writing pedagogy

Désirée Motta Roth, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil

 

What's your problem? Constructing and communicating learning problems in problem-oriented writing at university

Sanne Knudsen, Ph.D., Roskilde University, Denmark

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

L13.) Archival research of writing practices

Troubling the borders of writing history: Gender, nation and commerce in George Fisher’s Young man’s best companion

Shawn Casey, Ohio State University

 

Believe you me: Secular talk and the ontology of the personal essay

Douglas Christensen, University of Utah

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

L14.) Comparative pedagogies and transborder experiences as a glimpse of the future

Cross-national views on U.S. and Oaxacan pedagogies

Anne-Marie Hall, University of Arizona

 

 

Global rhetorics of professionalization: A cross-cultural study in Costa Rica

Susan Meyers, University of Arizona

 

 

ŃSi, se puede!: Latina student persistence in FYC

Anne Varley, University of Arizona

 

Border-crossing in the classroom:  Immigrant students and habitus

Daylanne Markwardt, University of Arizona

 

Crossing borders and the “educated person”

Rebecca Richards, University of Arizona

 

Composing the college student identity: 'La familia' rhetoric in the

literacy practices of early outreach on the U.S./Mexico border

Rachel Lewis, University of Arizona

 

Room:  Phelps 3505

L15.)  The European Research Network on learning to write effectively

 

Room:  Phelps 1425

 

 

 

Lunch:  12:15 -1:00

Boxed lunches provided in the Phelps Courtyard

 

 

M Sessions:  Sunday 1:00- 2:30

M1.) Levels of language in assessment and instruction:  Lessons from longitudinal studies grades 1 to 7

Panel Organized by: Virginia W. Berninger, University of Washington

Chair: Brett Miller, NICHD Virginia W. Berninger, U. of Washington    

 

Discussant:  Gary Troia, Michigan State University

 

Virginia W. Berninger, U. of Washington

Noelia Garcia, University of Washington

William Nagy, Seattle Pacific University

Scott Beers, Seattle Pacific University

Amy Augsburger, University of Washington

John R. Hayes, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Linking domain and situated motivation for writing with writing performance and experiences

Gary Troia, Michigan State University

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

M2.) Learning to write and writing to learn among elementary school students

Build students’ capacity for writing to learn:  A design experiment

Perry Klein, The University of Western Ontario

Boba Samuels, The University of Western Ontario

Mary Johnston, The Thames Valley Board of Education

 

Metatextual awareness and the establishment of textual cohesion:  An intervention study

Kátia Leal Reis de Melo, CE – UFPE – Brazil

Alina Galvčo Spinillo, CFCH – UFPE – Brazil

 

 

 

Improving first grader’s writing through genre study and reproduction

 

Sara B. McCraw, University of Delaware

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

M3.) National study of writing instruction: A close look at three settings

Linda Baker, University at Albany, State University of New York

Renee Banzhaf, University at Albany, State University of New York

Chin Ee Loh, University at Albany, State University of New York

Kristen Campbell Wilcox, University at Albany, State University of New York

Linda Baker

Renee Banzhaf

Chin Ee Loh

Kristen Campbell Wilcox

 

Room:  Phelps 3505

M4.) What spelling errors can tell us about writing development

Spelling errors in written French: An on-line investigation

Harriet Jisa, Institut des Sciences de l'Homme, France

Séverine Maggio, Université Blaise Pascal, France

Michel Fayol, Université Blaise Pascal, France

 

The effects of an adapted writing program on elementary school students’ ability to write coherent narrative texts: A longitudinal Canadian study in a Francophone minority situation

Martine Cavanagh, Campus Saint-Jean, University of Alberta, Canada

 

Invented spelling activities and the phonetization of Portuguese pre-school children’s writing 

Margarida Alves Martins, Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Portugal

Ana Cristina Silva, Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Portugal

Marta Sousa, Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Portugal

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

M5.) Multimodality in teaching and research 

Making use of the multimodality of scientific texts in broadening writing research and conceptions of narrative about the material world

Steven Forbes Tuckey, Michigan State University

 

Multimodal texts: Situating narratives across borders

Kevin J. Burke, Michigan State University

 

Re-presenting scientific literacy: How subjectivity emerges in multimodal contexts

Kelly Zacha Merritt, Michigan State University

 

Room:  Phelps 1425

M6. Cancelled


) Writing across continents – Writing and research between North America and Africa

Research on the writing of U.S. and South Africa students: The discourse of liberation and equity in online and offline contexts

Arnetha F. Ball, Stanford University

Warren Liew, Stanford University

 

Intellectual and technological hospitality in an online, international, collaborative teaching and research project

Suzanne Blum Malley, Columbia College

John Ruiters, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa

 

Writing (in)between, writing with shadows

Dalene M. Swanson, The University of British Columbia

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940

M7. ) Critical, democratic pedagogy and participant observation:  Methodology to uncover students’ understandings and reactions

William H. Thelin, University of Akron

Kara Taczak, University of Akron

Tricia Rashidioun, University of Akron

 

Room:  University Center State Street Room

M8.) Overviews of K-12 writing instruction

Writing in the Secondary secondary Schoolschool: 25 Years of Progressprogress, or déją vu all over again?

Arthur N. Applebee, University of Albany, SUNY

 

Writing as critical and creative thought

Judith A. Langer, University at Albany, SUNY

 

Defining writing in a “didactic” framework

Yves Reuter, Université Charles de Gaulle, France

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

M9.) Assessing the writing proficiency of future elementary school teachers: Results from year one of the Teachers for a New Era Literacy Research Project at California State University, Northridge        

 

Chair: Kathleen Dudden Rowlands, California. State University., Northridge

 

Tina Bertacchi-Love, California State University, Northridge

Pamela Bourgeois, California State University, Northridge

Sandra Chong, California State University, Northridge

Irene Clark, California State University, Northridge

Renee Ziolkowska, California State University, Northridge

Theresa MontaĖo, California State University, Northridge

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

M10.) Examining cross-cultural interactions with "home" discourses in WAC/WID work

Interdisciplinary (Writingwriting) Collaborationcollaboration, Interdisciplinary interdisciplinary (Crosscross-cultural) Communicationcommunication

Maureen Mathison, University of Utah

 

Not at home at home: Rich feature/context sensitive analysis of English department discourse on disciplinary writing

Doug Downs, Utah Valley State College

 

The WID research interview as a rhetorical frame for generating collaborative interdisciplinary conversation

Sarah Reed, University of Washington

 

Room:  South Hall 1430


M11.) Writing instructional practices in UK and European schools

Policy and practice in teaching writing in UK schools

Roger Beard, University of London, UK

Debra Myhill, University of Exeter, UK

 

The Role of Writing in European National Curricula (year 1 - 13)

Sigmund Ongstad, Oslo University College, Norway

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

M12.2) Languages of book reviews

The impact of contextual configuration on genre:  A comparative study of academic vs. “mass-market” book reviews

 Ma. Llüsia Gea Valor , Universitat Jaume I Castelló, Spain

 

The language of evaluation in literary academic journal book reviews: Matching theoretical descriptions of evaluation and practical applications to teaching

Ana I. Moreno, Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain

Lorena Suarez, Universidad de León, Spain

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

M13.) The research exchange: Redefining writing research and scholarship

Joan Mullin, University of Texas

Glenn Blalock, Baylor University

Jenn Fishman, University of Tennessee
Doug Hesse, University of Denver

Mike Palmquist, Colorado State University

Stephen Wilhoit, University of Dayton

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

M14.) Literacy in a diverse world

Approaching literate practices on the basis of the continuum restricted-full literacy

Maria Sílvia Cintra, Federal University of Sčo Carlos

 

Trans-collaboration:  Productively engaging difference in the 21st- century

Mara Holt

 

The rhetoric of global citizen action

Ljiljana Coklin, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

 

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

M15.) teaching writing through inquiry 

Writing expository texts based on inquiry learning

Michel Couzijn, University of Amsterdam, The the Netherlands

Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam, The the Netherlands

 

Writing in history: The need for secondary content-based writing instruction

Susan De La Paz, Santa Clara University

Mark Felton, San Jose State University

 

Writing instruction to improve students’ compare -contrast reports

Lori Kirkpatrick, University of Western Ontario, Canada

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

M16.) International association for interdisciplinary research in writing studies organizational meetingOpen session for international networking

 

All conference participants are invited to this open meeting to discuss international networking and organizational possibilities.

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

N Sessions:  Sunday 2:45-4:15

 

N1.) Roundtable on team grading procedures

Chair: Bob Mayberry, CSU Channel Islands

Speakers:  Faculty of California State University, Channel Islands

 

 

 

Room:  University Center State Street Room

N2.) Urban language-scapes:  Studies of youth and adult writing and literacy practices in urban settings

Intersubjectivity during writing activities:  How context and social interaction support young children’s literacy development

Lynda D. Stone, California State College, Sacramento

Sarah Gibbons, California State College, Sacramento

Kathleen Lyden, California State College, Sacramento

 

Youth performing writing in an urban community: Politics, narratives, and struggles

Valerie Kinloch, Teachers College, Columbia UniversityOhio State University

 

Room:  University Center Harbor Room

N3.) The politics of speech patterns:  Linguistic analysis in classroom, national, and international settings

On textual silences, large and small

Thomas Huckin, University of Utah

 

Language difference, error, and writing across borders

Bruce Horner, University of Louisville

Min-Zhan Lu, University of Louisville

 

The discourse of propaganda:  North Korean news genres

Brandon Loudermilk, U.C. Davis

Marcus Piazzola, Texas State University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1940Phelps 1425

N4.) Grammar, parts of speech, and writing skill development

The Adverbial Cycle revisited:  expressing linking, stance and circumstance

Edward de Chazal, University College London, UK

 

A corpus-based study of the use of nouns to construct stance by native and non-native academic speakers of English

Hüseyin Kafes, Anadolu University, Turkey

 

Grammar and editing in the writing classroom: Going against the grain

Craig Cotich, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Room:  South Hall 1432

N5.) Online literacy

Research across the digital border

Merry Rendahl, University of Minnesota

Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch, University of Minnesota

Beyond search: Online literacy practices in academic settings

Monica Bulger, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Verifying web-based information and writing as a system of representation

David W. Overbey, Bellarmine University

 

Room: Phelps 3505

 

N6.) Evidences of young writers’ developing competencies

Good writers always have a sharp pencil: The relationship between knowledge of writing and narrative writing quality in elementary students.

Natalie G. Olinghouse, Michigan State University

Steve Graham, Vanderbilt University

 

The quest for a motivated pause threshold for young non-expert writers

Florence Chenu, University of Lyon, France

Bernard Léte, University of Lyon, France

Franćois Pellegrino, University of Lyon, France

 

Developmental trajectories in orchestration of paragraphing

Debra Myhill, University of Exeter, U.K.

Susan Jones, University of Exeter, U.K.

 

Room:  Phelps 2516

N7.) Studying genre in teaching and teacher development

Toward the experimental confirmation of North-American genre theory: A study of student

study of student on-line academic writing in undergraduate literature classes

classes

Sheridan Blau, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Redrawing the borders:  Accounting for technologies in genre theory & research

Leah Zuidema, Dordt College

Conducting the scholarship of teaching: Spanning boundaries and blurring genres

Patricia Lambert Stock,

Michigan State University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1920

N8.) Research on writing instruction

Linking research with practice for writing and literacy education

Melanie Sperling, U.C. Riverside

 

Context and activity, a powerful framework for writing instruction and research

Marta Milian, Universitat Autėnoma Barcelona, Spain

 

Crossing the border from university to middle school—and back again

Betsy Gilliland, U.C. Davis

Shannon Pella, U.C. Davis

 

Room:  Phelps 1260

N9.) National research, international perspectives: A cross-cultural exchange about disciplinary writing research at French universities

Tiane Donahue, Chair, University of Maine-Farmington

John Brereton, The Boston Athenaeum

Cinthia Gannett, Loyola College in Maryland

Theresa Lillis, The Open University

Franćoise Boch, Université de Grenoble III

Isabelle Delcambre, Université de Lille III

 

Room:  Phelps 2524

N10. Chapters from the Handbook of research on writing

Perspectives from the Handbook of research on writing

Chair:  Charles Bazerman, U. C. Santa Barbara

 

Anne Beaufort, University of Washington, Tacoma

Pietro Boscolo, Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Italy

Jennifer Clary-Lemon, University of Winnipeg, Canada

Ulla Connor, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Brenton Faber, North Carolina State University

Sandra Murphy, U.C. Davis 

Nancy Nelson, Texas A&M, Corpus Christi

Paul Prior, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Graham Smart, Carleton College

Peter Tiersma, Loyola Law School

 

 

Room:  Buchanan 1910

 

N11) Student roles and strategies across the curriculum

Three students join a community of practice and acquire an academic voice to write from: Chicano Activist Writers and their writing development

 

Sarah Boggs, U.C. Santa Barbara

 

Preparing students to write:  A case study of the role played by student questions in their quest to understand how to write in economics

Barbara Wake, University of Adelaide, Australia

 

Science-based written summarization and opinion essay-writing of academically-underprepared community college students

Dolores Perin, Teachers College, Columbia University

N11. Writing across the border: Writing practices among more diverse student populations

A study of ‘international’ students’ writing: From norms to politics in a globalising academic world

Mary Scott, Institute of Education, London, UK

 

Academic writing socialization: ESL students’ border crossing across geographic and curricular spaces

Hyechong Park, Oregon State University

 

Room:  Buchanan 1930

N12.) Working memory, fluency and performance

Writing, speaking, and memory performance:  Scope and limits of the writing superiority effect

Joachim Grabowski, Heidelberg University of Education, Germany

 

The automaticity of transcription allows longer execution bursts in typing, but not in handwriting

Rui Alexandre Alves, University of Porto, Portugal

Sčo Luís Castro, University of Porto, Portugal

Thierry Olive, CNRS and University of Poitiers, France

 

How cognitive processes and working memory impact writing fluency:

Revisiting the literature

Sara C. Lewandowski, Michigan State University

 

Room:  Phelps 2536

N13.) Writing in adolescence: Hypertexts and contexts

Writing hypertexts: Effects on writing and knowing

Martine Braaksma, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Tanja Janssen, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

 

Writing research, adolescents, and the new mainstream

Kerry Enright Villalva, U.C. Davis

 

Pushing the boundaries of writing: The multimodal literacies of bilingual

youth radio

Deborah Romero, University of Northern Colorado

Dana Walker, University of Northern Colorado

 

Room:  South Hall 1430

N14.) New ways of promoting community literacy

Community literacy research, 1980-2008: Cross-cultural perspectives from

Nicaragua and the U.S

Michael R. Moore, Michigan Technological University

 

Community writing, and writing communities: How rhetoric and composition scholars construct community literacy

Kendall Leon

 

Room:  Phelps 3519

N15.) Constructions of meaning: Texts in international contexts

Researching Writing writing Through through Virtual virtual Exchangeexchange

George Pullman, Georgia State University

Susan Thomas, University of Sydney, Australia

 

Minding the Home home Frontfront: Lessons on Internationalization internationalization from Technical technical Communication communication Textbookstextbooks

Paul Kei Matsuda, Arizona State University

Aya Matsuda

Matt Schneider

 

Room:  South Hall 1431

 

0 Session:  Sunday 4:30-5:30

Closing Plenary: Reflections on writing research and writing praxis

Closing Plenary:  Reflections on writing research across borders

Chair:  Sheridan Blau, U.C. Santa Barbara & Columbia Teachers College

 

Peter Elbow, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 

t

Room:  Buchanan 1910