University of California Santa Barbara

Writing 02, Section 21

TR 9-10:50 a.m.

GIRV 2124

 

 

Name

Dr. Christopher Dean

Office:  Girvetz 1314

Phone:  (203) 313-1343

Email:  cdean@writing.ucsb.edu

Mailbox: Located in South Hall 1519.  (Note: box is above name.)

Office Hours

Monday: 12-1:00 p.m. and 3-4 p.m.

Tuesday:  11:00 a.m-12:30 p.m.

Wednesday:  12-1:00 p.m.

Thursday:  11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

And By Appointment

 

Course Enrollment Code:  45658                                                                Credit Hours:  4     

Prerequisite:  Passing the exam formerly known as the “Subject A Exam”    Course Title:  Writing 2: Academic Writing

 

COURSE CATALOG DESCRIPTION: 

 

A writing course focusing on developing analytical skills, synthesizing multiple sources, sustaining coherent arguments, and revising for clarity of style.  Reading and writing assignments are drawn from a range of academic disciplines.

 

COURSE’S CONTRIBUTION:

 

This is a course about reading, writing, and thinking in their broadest and bests senses.  This course emphasizes these ten key ideas:

 

·     That reading and writing are related in important ways to each other.

·     That reading at the collegiate level is a process that can be taught and learned in a variety of academic disciplines.

·     That challenging texts in a variety of disciplines are accessible to students through reading strategies that they will be taught in this class.

·     That writing is an ongoing process of creation and revision.

·     That research at the collegiate level is a process of following a question to an answer that one does not already know.

·     That grammar and mechanics matter in writing, but that they must be learned in context.

·     That analysis, synthesis and interpretation are tied directly to learning to read, write, and research well.

·     That writing and reading can be informal or formal experiences, and that both experiences matter.

·     That writing and reading are not chores to be performed, but activities that should provide your with intellectual stimulation, an almost physical sense of happiness, and, by the by, fun.

·     That writing and reading comes in all shapes and sizes, and is done for a variety of reasons. 

 

To get at these ten key ideas, we will read and write a great deal, and we will write around the idea of “what it means to be you in our shared world” through three distinct genres and in three distinct disciplines:  the memoir (English); an interpretive/argumentative essay (Psychology); and an argumentative researched essay (Technology/Communication).  I am very open to having you work in a variety of genres that you choose, and these will show up in the blogging and in-class writing that you will be doing in class.  You will also find that I encourage, and actually force you, to come up with ideas that you want to write about within the parameters of our readings, your research, and this course.

 

One final bit of advice.  You will have lots of freedom to write and read about things that interest you in this class, so please find ways to get excited and engaged about our shared topics and the pieces you will be writing.  If you do this you will never have to utter my least favorite phrase, “This (fill in the blank) is boring.”  I’m begging you folks:  please write about stuff you care about.

 

STUDENT OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENTS

 


At the end of this course through class discussions, group activities, debates, reading, and written work students will be able to do the following[1]:

 

Reading:

·         Comprehend and respond to essays and non-fiction texts, which will be contextualized with additional reading materials—including the Internet and other types of research.

·         Respond to readings in analytical and argumentative ways—with a focus on synthesizing new knowledge.

·         Extend their ability to analyze the structures and effectiveness of argument.

·         Engage in multiple readings of texts to extend their understanding of said texts.

·         Extend their knowledge of rhetorical terms to include terms for analyzing arguments, such as appeals to emotion, character, and logic; fallacies of argument; and claims, reasons, and warrants.

These objectives will be assessed via student’s written work in papers, portfolios and in their writing in the Writing II Blog.  Also these goals will be informally assessed via online and face-to-face discussions, meetings with the teacher, and other classroom interactions.

 

Writing:

·         Write in a variety of genres in a variety of disciplines to think about what it means to study in a particular academic area.

·         Analyze strengths and weakness of written arguments, including their own.

·         Extend their ability to reflect on their writing processes.

·         Extend their ability to analyze, synthesize, and interpret reading via writing.

·         Extend their ability to provide evidence and learn to evaluate the credibility of sources.

·         Practice research-based writing in order to join a conversation in a discipline about a topic rather than simply report on facts about a topic.

·         Extend their practice and experimentation with the conventions of writing that clarify and enhance meaning; students will learn that error is a necessary and productive part of the learning process.  (We will talk about grammar in this class, but not just about what is “right” and “wrong.”  We will discuss the options that grammar provides.)

·         Ultimately create 18-20 pages of well-edited, thoughtful texts that students can be proud they wrote.

These objectives will be assessed via student’s written work in papers, portfolios and through the Writing II Blog.  Also these goals will be informally assessed via online and face-to-face discussions, writing conferences with the teacher, and other classroom interactions.

 

 

MODES OF LEARNING

 

·        Direct instruction (i.e. minilectures)

·        Demonstration and presentation

·        Cooperative and collaborative group work

·        Large and small group discussion

·        Reflective work

·        Individual research

·        Electronic discourse

 


REQUIRED TEXTS

·        Class Packet—available at the Alternative Copy Center in Isla Vista.

·        Handouts distributed in class.

·        The class website, located at http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/faculty/dean/ 

·        Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum:  Brief Edition by Laurence Behrens and Leonard Rosen.  (Available at the bookstore in the University Center at UCSB.)

 

·        A Writer’s Reference:  Fifth Edition by Diana Hacker.  (Available at the bookstore in the University Center at UCSB.)

  

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The Papers:

Since all papers are part of a writing process, students will be expected to turn in drafts of papers—as per the classroom schedule.  You will also receive in writing the following:  sample papers, rubrics, and complete descriptions of each writing assignment as you do the writing for this class.  Also, to receive full-credit for a paper you must turn in your paper on the day it is due by 5 p.m.  Each day it is late, it drops a grade.  (You can turn in your papers to me in class or to the Writing Program Drop box, located in front of the Writing Program Office, which is located in South Hall 1520.)

 

·        Memoir: An essay (of 4-6 pages) that involves you looking at your life in a critical and reflective fashion.  The story you tell is not as important as the meaning you make of it for this type of essay.

o       Final Draft:  10% of final grade

·        Critique/Argumentative Essay:  A paper (4-6 pages) in which the student takes on an issue, and critiques it using our readings in the Behrens and Rosen on Psychology.  Students will have a series of options to write about, or they can propose (in a one page paper proposal) their own topic. 

o       Final Draft:  10% of final grade

·        Technology/Communication Research and Synthesis Paper:  A paper (6-8 pages) in which the student uses classroom readings and outside research to think about a particular topic in Technology or Communications Studies.  Or they can propose (in a one page paper proposal) their own topic.  This paper will also involve outside research.

o       Final Draft:  10% of final grade

·        Writing II Blog (kept through the duration of the class). 

o       Evaluated twice during the semester.  Once before midterms, and once towards the end of class.  Students will be evaluated on completing the appropriate number of entries in sufficient depth.  Also, students must either write a response to a particular reading on a particular day, or they must write a response to another person’s response to a piece of reading in the blog.  All of this must be done PRIOR TO COMING TO CLASS.  We will be using our blogs as a way to talk about our reading.  You will also be getting guided questions that ask you to think about the arguments that writers are making, and to engage in synthetic and critical thinking.  The blog is located at http://deanwr2.blogspot.com/

o       Percentage of total grade:  20%

 


·        Portfolios:  A collection of the best work by the student in our class.  There will be a midterm portfolio and a final portfolio submitted.  You will receive instructions on how to assemble portfolios in class, and you will also receive rubrics for these portfolios prior to handing them in to be graded.

o       40% of final grade (15% midterm, 25% final).

·        Attendance and Participation:  Since this is a class where attendance is a necessity (due to peer feedback, in-class activities, out of class conferences, and in-class writing assignments), I will take roll.  Also, your drafts and your participation will factor into this part of the grade.  This percentage will also include a midterm, in-class writing on our readings, which will be used to help you think through how to prepare for in-class essay tests primarily.  Also, to do well in this area of the class you need to keep your absences to two absences in conferences or class.  We will meet three times outside of class to conduct one-on-one conferences.  This will be an opportunity for you to ask questions about papers, the conduct of the class, and even more far ranging questions, like “What’s the secret to a happy life?”  (The answer to this, by the by, is chocolate—lots of chocolate.)  ONCE YOU GET ABOVE FOUR ABSENCES YOUR OVERALL GRADE WILL DROP ONE LETTER GRADE FOR EACH ADDITIONAL ABSENCE.  The only way to “excuse” an absence is to bring a signed note for your absences past four.  Needing to be there for you pet goldfish “Stanley” as he has elective surgery will not be considered an excused absence. 

o       10% of total grade

·        Additional Help:  I strongly encourage you to get help with your writing from friends, family, and the tutors (which you pay for through tuition and student fees) from CLAS (Campus Learning Assistance Services).  CLAS is located just across from South Hall.  Their physical locations are Buildings 300 and 477, and you can see more about CLAS by checking out their website located at http://www.clas.ucsb.edu/Info.htm.  Remember every good writer uses others to help them make their writing better.  You can also call and set up an appointment with CLAS by calling893-3269.  There are also two other organizations on campus that might prove helpful to you, and they are Counseling & Career Services (893-4411) and Disabled Students Program (DSP) (893-2668).  Counseling and Career Services can help you many questions you might have as a student and person, and DSP is a place that can help you if you have a documented disability that might impinge on your ability to academic work at UCSB. 

·        Notice To Students With Disabilities:  If you are a student with a documented disability and would like to discuss special accommodations, please contact me during office hours, after class, or in whatever way would be best for you to talk to me privately.[2]

·        Rewrites:  Once your final drafts of papers are done you can rewrite them—FOR YOUR FINAL PORTFOLIO.  If you want to change a grade on a paper, then you can turn in that paper on 11-22-05 for a regrade.  YOU CAN TURN IN ONE PARTICULAR PAPER FOR A REGRADE.  Revision is heavily emphasized in this class, and that is why the largest chunk of your grade are tied to two portfolios that demand rewriting, not just editing, of your work.

·        Plagiarism:  As my colleague and officemate Professor Doug Bradley writes, “Plagiarism is the copying of a part or whole of another person’s work while representing the work as your own; it is an extremely serious academic offense.”  (Read more of Professor Bradley’s views on plagiarism at http://www.1startists.com/courses/writ2e/syllabus.html.)  The best way to avoid plagiarism is to cite all the sources you use in a paper correctly, and never ever try to pass off someone else’s writing as your own—period.  I will teach you everything I know about properly citing sources, so that you will never face charges of unintentional plagiarism, but I have no patience with people who engage in intentional plagiarism.  Plagiarism offenses are treated seriously by the University, and may result in failure of the paper and of the course, in addition to further potential sanctions by the Student Faculty Conduct Committee. 

·        Access to an email account.  You will have one by virtue of being a UCSB student.

·        One 3.5” floppy disk or CD-ROM or Flash Drive (for your work done in this class).

 


TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE:  SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE DISCRETION OF THE TEACHER

 

Week One

Unit One:  Memoir (Writing For The
Humanities)

 

Tuesday:  9/22/05

·        Reading:  In class.  “The Poisoned Fish” by Ken Macrorie

·        Assignments:  In class, brainstorm for personal experience essay.

·        Class Activities:  Getting to Know You, In-class reading, and Writing Exercise. 

 

Week Two

Unit One:  Memoir (Writing For The
Humanities)

Tuesday:  9/27/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  “On Dumpster Diving.”  In packet from the Alternative Copy Center.  Also, re-read syllabus and bring questions about it to class—everyone will turn in one question.

·        Assignments:  Start work on your memoir.  First draft due 9/29/05.  (BRING TWO COPIES TO CLASS ON MONDAY.)  BLOG FOR THE FIRST TIME IN CLASS. 

·        Class activities:  Discussion of readings at https://secure.lsit.ucsb.edu/phpbb/.  In-class work on leads of memoir.  In class blogging.

THIS IS THE LAST DAY TO DROP THIS CLASS.  DROPS MUST BE COMPLETED ON “GOLD” BY 11:45 P.M.

Thursday: 9/29/05

·        Reading:  Anonymous Student essay “Reality Check: A Life With No Degree”.  “Me Talk Pretty Some Day” by David Sedaris.  Both pieces are in the packet.

·        Assignments:  Blog.  Bring 2 paper copies of your first draft of your memoir to class.

·        Class activities:  Peer review.  Discussion of “Me Talk Pretty Some Day.”  Grading of student paper using class rubric.

 

Week Three

Unit One:  Memoir (Writing For The
Humanities)
& Unit Two:  The Critique/Argumentative Essay (Writing for the Social Sciences)

CONFERENCE WEEK

Tuesday:  10/4/05 

·        Reading:  Chapter Two, “Critical Reading and Critique”, pages 21-37 and pages 156-167 of Chapter Five, “Obedience to Authority” in Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum.

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class.  Start final draft of Memoir, due on 10/6/05.

·        Class Activities: Discussion of “Obedience to Authority.”  Work on Critical Reading and Critique in class.  Common Errors work from your papers.  I will also return your papers to you today.  Introduction to second paper.  SIGN UP FOR FIRST CONFERENCES WITH CHRIS.

Monday:  10/6/05

·        Reading:  “The Perils of Obedience” by Stanley Milgram, pages 168-181 of Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, and “Review of Stanley Milgram’s Experiments on Obedience” by Diana Baumrind, pages 181-187of Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum.

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class.  Turn in final draft of Memoir.  Start first Draft of your “Critique/Argumentative Essay”, due on 10/13/05. 

·        Class Activities:  Introduction to “The Critique/Argumentative Essay.”  Debate:  are people more likely to obey or disobey authority. 

 

 


Week Four

Unit Two:  The Critique/Argumentative Essay (Writing for the Social Sciences)
 
Tuesday:  10/11/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  “The Stanford Prison Experiment” by Philip K Zimbardo.  From pages 199-211 in Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum.

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class.

·        Class Activities:  Video of “The Stanford Prison Experiment.”  Discussion of reading, face-to-face and online.  Work on thesis statement and topic sentences. 

Thursday:  10/13/05

·        Reading:  “The Organization Kid” by David Brooks, pages 217-226, in Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum.

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class.  Bring in two copies of your first draft of “The Critique/Argumentative Essay” for peer and teacher review. 

·        Class Activities:  Peer Review.  Discussion of “The Organization Kid.”  Online Discussion Topic:  When and where should we follow authority?  Choose piece to re-read.

 

Week Five

Unit Two:  The Critique/Argumentative Essay (Writing for the Social Sciences) ­ & The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

 

Tuesday:  10/18/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  Re-read a selection.  Chris’ Sample paper—handed out in class.

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class.  Start on final draft of “The Critique/Argumentative Essay”, due 10-20-05.

·        Class Activities:  Meet in reading groups for in-depth discussion of piece you re-read.  Taking apart Chris’ first draft via overhead or computers.  Common Errors work and student essays returned from teacher.

Thursday:  10/20/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  “Journey of an E-mail”, pages 95-101 and “Going Postal” from Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum.

·        Assignments:  Blog on your position on email—outside of class.  Bring in final draft of “The Critique/Argumentative Essay”. 

·        Class Activities:  Editing Work.  Discussion of email readings.  Debate on the value of email.  Introduction to midterm portfolio and midterm “exam.” 

 

Week Six

Unit Three:  The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

CONFERENCE WEEK

Tuesday:  10/25/05

·        Reading:  None.

·        Assignments:  Bring in questions for midterm exam.  Turn in midterm portfolios.

·        Class Activities:  Sign up for midterm conferences.  Do in-class writing midterm.

Thursday:  10/27/05

·        Reading:  “Faking it:  The Virtual Lawyer”, pages 137-150, from Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum and “Even Geeks Need a Breather,” which is available through Wired Online at http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,68499,00.html?tw=wn_8culthead (READ IT ONLINE). 

·        Assignment:  Blog outside of class, prior to class. 

·        Class Activities:  Discussion of Readings.  Brainstorming for the “Argumentative Researched Essay.”  1st draft, an outline and proposal, due on 11/3/05.  MAKE SURE TO BRING TWO COPIES OF PAPER TO CLASS ON THIS DAY.

Week Seven

Unit Three:  The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

 

Tuesday:  11/1/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  “Video Games, Mind, and Learning” by James Gee.  Available at http://www.academiccolab.org/resources/documents/IDMA_Paper.pdf and “Violent Video Games: Myths, Facts,
and Unanswered Questionsby Craig A. Anderson.  Available at http://www.apa.org/science/psa/sb-anderson.html (Print out your favorite of the two articles and bring it to class.)

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class. 

·        Class Activities:  Debate:  are videogames and violence linked, and if so, then so what?  More brainstorming for “Critique/Argumentative Essay.”  How to cite exercise. 

Thursday:  11/3/05

·        Reading:  Read Chapter 3, “Synthesis”, from Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, pages 38-75.

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class.  1st draft, an outline and proposal of “The Argumentative Researched Essay”, due on 10/31/05.  MAKE SURE TO BRING TWO COPIES OF PAPER TO CLASS ON THIS DAY.

·        Class Activities:  Sample Synthesis activity.  Peer Review.  Research work. 

 

Week Eight

Unit Three:  The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

 

Tuesday:  11/8/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  “Q&A: Bill Gates Looks Ahead, Defends Software Security”, located at http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i48/48a02601.htm (print up and annotate a copy for class). 

·        Assignments:  Blog outside of class, prior to class. 

·        Class Activities:  Discussion of Gates future.  Design what your children will use in school to write.  Go over “doable research.” 

Thursday:  11/10/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  Selection from The Curious Researcher by Bruce Ballenger, pages 25-62.  In our packet.

·        Assignment:  Do two of the activities from Ballenger for your Blog entry.

·        Class Activities:  Bounce ideas off each other for topics and guiding questions.  Provisional questions.  Topic Gallery Exercise.

Week Nine

Unit Three:  The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

CONFERENCE WEEK

Tuesday:  11/15/05

·        Reading:  Your own research.  “We are Not Alone” by Emily Moniz from our packet.

·        Assignment:  Blog.

·        Class Activities:  Talk about note taking and "settling" your topic.  Titles exercise for paper.  Talk about sample paper.

Thursday 11/17/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  Selection from The Curious Researcher by Bruce Ballenger, pages 125-172.  In our packet.  Also read the sample research paper, which is also located in our packet. 

·        Assignment:  Do two of the activities from Ballenger on the Blog.  Start writing your researched essay—be sure to come with at least four pages to Tuesday’s class, if not more.

·        Class Activities:  In-class work on research strategies.  Discussion of Ballenger and where you are.  Q and A about researched essay.  Problem-solving exercise. 

 

 

Week Ten

Unit Three:  The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

Tuesday 11/22/05  (Meet in THE MESA COMPUTER LABlocated in Phelps 1525)

·        Reading:  Read pages 295—325 of Diana Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference.

·        Assignment:  Blog.  Bring in opening pages of your researched essay in electronic format—either as a .doc file or a .rtf file.

·        Class Activities:  Peer review on page one of your essay.  Q and A work on your piece.  Further Online Research.  Email Chris your

 

Week Eleven

Unit Three:  The Argumentative Researched Essay (Writing For the Sciences)

Tuesday 11/29/05  (Meet in Miramar Computer Lab—located in Phelps 1526)

·        Reading:  Selection from The Curious Researcher by Bruce Ballenger, pages 221-249.  In our packet.

·        Assignment:  Blog.

·        Class Activities:  Peer review on your essay.  How to create works cited exercise.  Discussion of Ballenger.  Choose final capper reading.

Thursday 12/1/05

·        Reading:  Student chosen reading.

·        Assignment:  Final draft of Researched Essay.  You will receive your grade to date.

·        Class Activities:  Discussion of reading.  Bring in work that you want to get feedback on for your final portfolio.  Start Dear Reader Letter in class.

 

Your final portfolio must be turned into me by 12/9/05.  THERE IS NO FINAL FOR THIS CLASS OTHER THAN YOU TURNING IN YOUR PORTFOLIO.

HAVE A GREAT WINTER BREAK!



[1] These outcomes and assessments are tied to the Writing II Curriculum Guidelines, which you can view at http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/courses/curriculum.html

[2] This statement adapted from the “Guide to Constructing a Writing Program Syllabus,” which is available at http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/information/info.html.