Course Syllabus
Writing 50:  Writing and the Research Process
"Work and the Twenty-First Century"
Winter 2007
EnrlCd:  47654

 

Instructor: Chris Dean
Class Meeting Days:  Monday and Wednesday 1:00-2:50 p.m.
Class Location:  HSSB 1228
Office Location: Girvetz 1314 

Office Hours

Monday: 3-5 p.m.

Tuesday:  11-12 noon

Wednesday:  3-5 p.m.

And By Appointment


Phone: 203-313-1343
Email: cdean@writing.ucsb.edu 

Required Textbooks

ˇ         Course Reader: Available from Graphic Arts in Isla Vista.

ˇ         An academic handbook

ˇ         The class website, located at http://www.uweb.ucsb.edu/faculty/dean/Writing50-Sum06.html. 

Drop Deadline

The last day to drop Writing 50 is on Friday, January 12, 2007 at 6:45 p.m.  You can drop the course via Gold. Students who miss the drop deadline must petition the Writing Program director to drop, and requests are not easily granted.

Course Description and Contribution

The University of California Santa Barbara general catalog describes Writing 50 as a "writing course addressing the analytical skills underlying the research process of academic and professional communities. Writing 50 emphasizes the thinking and writing skills involved in independent research, including developing questions, designing and planning research, analyzing, contrasting and synthesizing multiple sources, and drawing conclusions." This section of Writing 50 focuses on what it means to be a worker in the 21st century, and our principal interest will be in helping you do collegiate research in a way that will help you learn about something that you are interested in and help you think about what you want to do after your undergraduate career. 

You will learn how move from initial thoughts (a research proposal); to field and library research (including surveys and working with online databases); to writing a draft (which is always open to change); to finalizing your writing (creating a final draft); to, finally, presenting your research to your colleagues in a sharp, polished way.  Ultimately, the goal here is simple:  for you to understand how to research, to write from research that you are interested in¸ and then to present your research in a way that you will be proud of—via a PowerPoint presentation and a final paper.

Finally, I believe that research, and learning about how to do it, should be fun, engaging, and rewarding.  Therefore, I will work as hard as I can to make class interesting (via the use of computers, debates, presentations, and even online games).  In return, I ask this one little thing:  do not allow yourself to be bored.  You will be writing about a future career or course of graduate study in this class—and you will choose what you research, so please, by all that’s holy, make sure that your topic does not bore you.  I guarantee that if you are not bored, then I will not be bored. 

Outcomes

After taking Writing 50, you should be able to:

1.       Conduct a significant independent research project, including developing questions; designing and planning research; analyzing, contrasting and synthesizing multiple primary and secondary sources; and drawing conclusions.

2.       Recognize differences among disciplinary approaches to a topic.

3.       Analyze the theoretical and disciplinary perspectives and rhetorical strategies underlying texts through critical reading and thinking.

4.       Identify and use the full range of university library services.

5.       Use both general and specialized catalogs, indices, and bibliographies.

6.       Build discipline-specific search strategies.

7.       Conduct Web-based research efficiently and selectively.

8.       Locate books, reference texts, journal articles, and other resources in the library.

9.       Distinguish among various types of sources--such as primary and secondary, popular and peer-reviewed, reference and circulating--as they evaluate those sources.

10.   Integrate, cite, and document sources correctly.

11.   Offer generously and receive readily assistance in collaborative projects.

12.   Present the results of their research in a poised and professional manner without the fear of public speaking. 

13.   See a bridge between the world within academe and the world beyond it.

Online access to course materials

The syllabus, schedule, assignments, readings, and resources for the course can be found on the Web @ http://www.uweb.ucsb.edu/faculty/dean. 

Grading

ˇ         Attendance and Participation:  Since this is a class where attendance is a necessity (due to peer feedback, in-class activities, out of class conferences, and in-class writing assignments), I will take roll.  In addition, your drafts and your participation will factor into this part of the grade.  In addition, to do well in this area of the class you need to keep your absences to two absences in conferences or class.  We will meet two times outside of class to conduct one-on-one conferences.  This will be an opportunity for you to ask questions about papers, the conduct of the class, and even more far ranging questions, like “What’s the secret to a happy life?”  (The answer to this, by the by, is chocolate—lots of chocolate.)

o       Percentage of Grade:  15%

ˇ         Résumé:  You will actually create a real live résumé that will allow you to look for work. If you ever wondered if your work in a writing class mattered, wonder no more.  You will write a résumé that will be letter perfect.  The résumé is a document that you can use repeatedly as you actually apply for jobs you want to hold.

o       Percentage of Final Grade:  10%

ˇ         Research Proposal and Research Question:  Contrary to popular belief, research is not about having a result in mind and then finding research that supports your presupposed ideas about a topic.  No my friends, research is really about coming up with a question that you want to pursue and following it through in a way that makes sense.  Thus, for this assignment, you will write out a research question, plot out an approach, and even do a little preliminary research to see what you actually want to discover, not prove.  You will also narrow down a topic so that is manageable.  Thus, you will not do your research on “becoming a lawyer”; you will narrow your topic to looking at something particular about becoming a lawyer—such as what does a lawyer actually need to study in law school to be ready to get a job after law school.

o       Percentage of Final Grade:  5%

ˇ         Information Interview or Survey: Transcription and Abstract or Questionnaire.  You will need, for your research, to talk to a live human being about what a career or course of study is all about.  To accomplish this, you will interview a professional in a field that you are interested in, and you will transcribe his/her comments.  Also, you will write up an abstract of what he or she says.  (The abstract being a central part of many academic texts.)  This information will be directly relevant to your research report.  This interview should be part of your final paper and presentation.

o       Percentage of Final Grade:  5%

ˇ         Research Blog or Notebook:  A key thing that you must do in research is to actually write about the sources that you find.  This is the first step toward creating a good PowerPoint and a fine paper.  Thus, you will create notes, via a blog or a notebook, for each of your 10-15 sources that you will use.  Each entry must have the following:  a date, a full bibliographic entry, and a page worth of notes, with references to specific page numbers.  There is an example of a blog (an electronic means of keeping notes) located at http://researchblogchris.blogspot.com/.  Whatever form you use, you must keep it up to date and have it ready to be checked prior to giving your presentation and prior to turning in your final paper.

o       Percentage of Final Grade:  15%

ˇ         PowerPoint Presentation:  To work in the 21st century is to be assured of three things:  death, taxes, and having to do a PowerPoint.  Thus, you will learn how to create a PowerPoint Presentation—based on the research that you have done on your topic—and present said PowerPoint to the class.  This maybe your first PowerPoint presentation, but it will not be your last.  Also, as a side note, these things are totally fun to put together.    

o       Percentage of Final Grade:  10%

ˇ         Final Researched Essay:  This is a 10-15 page piece (with at least ten different sources in your works cited/references), and it will not be a regurgitation of your research.  You will get to choose from several formats for your piece, but they will all involve you reflecting, thinking, and doing more than simply throwing out facts.  Your paper must have a purpose and a point to it—past “this is what I learned.”  This is the major assignment of the class, and the percentage of the grade that is tied to this piece reflects this.  Rest assured you will have lots of time to work on this, and I will do everything in my power to help you write a fine paper.

o       Percentage of Final Grade:  40%

 

Additional Help

I strongly encourage you to get help with your writing from friends, family, and the tutors (which you pay for through tuition and student fees) from CLAS (Campus Learning Assistance Services).  CLAS is located just across from South Hall.  Their physical locations are Buildings 300 and 477, and you can see more about CLAS by checking out their website located at http://www.clas.ucsb.edu/Info.htm.  Remember every good writer uses others to help them make their writing better.  You can also call and set up an appointment with CLAS by calling893-3269.  There are also two other organizations on campus that might prove helpful to you, and they are Counseling & Career Services (893-4411) and Disabled Students Program (DSP) (893-2668).  Counseling and Career Services can help you many questions you might have as a student and person, and DSP is a place that can help you if you have a documented disability that might impinge on your ability to academic work at UCSB. 

 

Notice to Students with Disabilities

If you are a student with a documented disability and would like to discuss special accommodations, please contact me during office hours, after class, or in whatever way would be best for you to talk to me privately.[1]

 

Rewrites

You can rewrite any piece for this class.  All rewrites, though, are due by the last day of class.  I will not accept rewrites after out last class meeting, so do not ask me to.

 

Plagiarism

As my colleague and officemate Professor Doug Bradley writes, “Plagiarism is the copying of a part or whole of another person’s work while representing the work as your own; it is an extremely serious academic offense.”  (Read more of Professor Bradley’s views on plagiarism at http://www.1startists.com/courses/writ2e/syllabus.html.)  The best way to avoid plagiarism is to cite all the sources you use in a paper correctly and never ever try to pass off someone else’s writing as your own—period.  I will teach you everything I know about properly citing sources, so that you will never face charges of unintentional plagiarism, but I have no patience with people who engage in intentional plagiarism.  Plagiarism offenses are treated seriously by the University, and may result in failure of the paper and of the course, in addition to further potential sanctions by the Student Faculty Conduct Committee. 

 

Access to an email account

You will have one by virtue of being a UCSB student, but make sure that you know how to use umail—since this is the email I will be using for you in this class.

 

Our Moodle Site

For course, we will be using a Moodle site to conduct discussions, crate threaded discussions, and other things.  The moodle site is located at http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu.  AT THE BEGINNING OF EVERY WEEK, YOU MUST CHECK THE MOODLE SITE AND THE WEBSITE FOR OUR SCHEDULE AND ASSIGNMENTS.

 

 

 

 

Storage

Since we will be working in a computer lab quite a bit, you need to make sure that you have something (like a jump drive) to store your work on.  Make sure that you bring your computer storage device to every class we have in the lab.

 

Final Note

I teach writing because I love it, and I also teach because I care about students.  I want you to succeed in this class, and I also want us all to learn how to research in ways that will, I hope, strike you as fun.  I’m serious about a lot of things (being on time, late work, and even making sure that résumés are free of grammatical errors); however, I believe that learning about researching and writing is fun too.  My hope is that you will exit this class having written something you are proud to have written, that you will be a more confident researcher and writer, and that you will have laughed and learned while laughing.

 

On this Being an Online Course

This class is not a correspondence class, and it will not be easier than a face-to-face class.  It will involve a great deal of writing, reading, thinking, and keeping on task.  I will be available online as much as humanly possible, and I will of course keep all of my conferences and office hours.  However, you need to make sure that you keep up in this class, do the work, and, most significantly, ask questions when they occur.  I check my email twice a day (morning and evening), and I will be available via phone as well.  I know that you will learn about writing while working with computers in an intensive way. 

 

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due

Many thanks to Paul Rogers, Doug Bradley, Michael Petraca, and Brian Loftus in helping me think through this course.  Particular thanks to Paul and Michael for their syllabi, which have helped me construct the very syllabus you have before you.  (Remember friends:  we must all acknowledge the sources that inspire us to write.)

 

Course Calendar For Writing 50 (MW 10-11:50 a.m.)

(The Calendar is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor.)

 

Week One:  What it Means to Work in the 21st Century—an Overview

 

MONDAY:  1-8-07

ˇ         Reading:  None.

ˇ         Writing:  What do I like to do and why?

ˇ         Class Activities:  Introductions, in-class reading, in-class writing.

WEDNESDAY:  1-10-07  (Meet in Computer Lab)

ˇ         Reading:  Introduction to Robert Reich’s The Future of Success and Chapter One (in packet) and “The Chemical Engineer Who Lacked a Chemical” from What Do I Want to Do with My Life (in packet).

ˇ         Class Activities:  In-class writing, discussion of texts, work in computer lab, and brainstorming for possible careers and courses of study to research.  Sign up for first conference with Chris.

 

Last day to drop a writing course is Friday, Jan. 12, 2006 at 6:45 p.m. on Gold

 


Week Two:  What it Means to Work in the 21st Century—an Overview and Beginning Research

CONFERENCE WEEK

 

MONDAY:  1-15-07

ˇ         No class:  MLK Day

 

WEDNESDAY:  1-17-07 (Meet in Computer Lab)

ˇ         Reading:  Introduction to Gig and self-chosen selection (in packet).  Robert Reich’s “The Lure of Hard Work” from The Future of Success (in packet).

ˇ         Writing:  First Draft of Research Proposal Due:  Research Proposal, three sources, and introduction.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Peer Review, discussion of Reich--online, and work on research.

 

Week Three:  Your Friend the Computer and Beginning Research

CONFERENCE WEEK

 

MONDAY:  1-22-07

ˇ         Reading:  Introduction and “Serving in Florida” from Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich (in packet). 

ˇ         Class Activities:  Post your response to “Serving in Florida” by 1 p.m. in the forum.  Post an elaborated response to peer’s work by 5 p.m.

 

WEDNESDAY:  1-24-07 (Meet via the Moodle site—http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu—from 1-2 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Online reading on creating interview and survey questions.  Located at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/559/01/.  Also read “The Summer of the Death of Hilario Guzman”, in packet. 

ˇ         Writing:  Final draft of research proposal due today.  Send your research proposal to Chris (inline and as an attachement)—Due by 5 p.m. on 1/24/07. 

ˇ         Class Activities:  Peer review of research proposal (post to forum).  Preliminary research PPT—in real time.  Preliminary research and research QandA via the forum.

 

Week Four:  Research and the Libarry

 

MONDAY:  1-29-07

ˇ         Reading:  Reread:  Online reading on creating interview and survey questions.  Located at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/559/01/

ˇ         Writing:  FIND AN INTEREVIEW SUBJECT OR CREATE SURVEY.  DRAFT OF QUESTIONS OR SURVEY DUE ON MONDAY 2-5-07.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Post your response to piece from the Purdue OWL by 1 p.m. in the forum.  Post an elaborated response to peer’s work by 5 p.m.

 

WEDNESDAY:  1-31-07 (Library Meeting:  Meet in front of the library at 1 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Library Assignment, Research Notes, Library Qand A.

 


Week Five:  The Library and Drafting

 

MONDAY:  2-5-07

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.

ˇ         Writing:  Questions for interview or survey due today. 

ˇ         Class Activities:  Post your response to a piece of research you have found on the web by 1.pm. under the forum.  Post an elaborated response to a peer’s work by 5 p.m.  Sign-up for group conference with Chris—you will be meeting in via a chat room in your groups. 

WEDNESDAY:  2-7-07 (Meet via the Moodle site—http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu—from 1-2 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.

ˇ         Writing:  Work on survey or interview write up—FINAL DRAFT DUE ON MONDAY 2-12-07.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Peer review of interview questions via the forum.  Research PPT viewing.  Research QandA via the forum.  Research assignment.

Week Six:  Writing and Presentations

 

MONDAY:  2-12-07

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.  Sample PowerPoint via webpage:  http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/faculty/dean. 

ˇ         Writing:  Final draft of survey or interview due today.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Response to powerpoint via the forum.  Send your final draft of your survey or interview to Chris (inline and as an attachement)—Due by 5 p.m. on 2-12-07. 

WEDNESDAY:  2-14-07 (Meet via the Moodle site—http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu—from 1-2 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Your own research reading and Sample Researched Essay (from website)

ˇ         Assignment:  First four to six presentations (extra credit for those who go first—be sure to turn in a copy of your research blog, research journal, or research notebook.  Debriefing after PowerPoints via the forum.  Group chat about research process.  Forum on research process.

 

Week Seven: Writing and Presentations

 

MONDAY:  2-19-07

No class:  President’s Day

 

WEDNESDAY:  2-21-07 (Meet via the Moodle site—http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu—from 1-2 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.  Sample Researched Essay (from website). 

ˇ         Class Activities:  Next six presentations—be sure to turn in a copy of your research blog, research journal, or research notebook.  Debriefing after presentations via forum.  Chat about  sample essay.  Sign up for one-on-one conferences with Chris.

 


Week Eight: Writing and Presentations

CONFERENCE WEEK

 

MONDAY:  2-26-07

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Research QandA via chat.  Further research work and problem solving via forum.

WEDNESDAY:  2-28-07 (Meet via the Moodle site—http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu—from 1-2 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.

ˇ         Writing:  First Draft of Researched Essay (6-8 pages, complete works cited, and all notes).  Send draft to Chris (inline and as an attachment).  Due by 5 p.m. on 2-28-07. 

ˇ         Class Activities:  Presentationsbe sure to turn in a copy of your research blog, research journal, or research notebook.  Debriefing after presentations via forum.  Peer review via forum.

 

Week Nine: Writing and Presentations

 

MONDAY:  3-5-07

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.  Sample resumes and cover letters from webpage.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Post your response to a piece of research you have found on the web by 1.pm. under the forum.  Post an elaborated response to a peer’s work by 5 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:  3-7-07 (Meet via the Moodle site—http://moodle.id.ucsb.edu—from 1-2 p.m.)

ˇ         Reading:  Your research reading.

ˇ         Writing:  First draft of resume and cover letter.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Full class peer review of resume for workshop.  Mock interviewing.  Discussion on the “job hunt.

 

Week Ten: Writing and Wrapping Up

 

MONDAY:  3-12-07 (Meet in HSSB 1214)

ˇ         Reading:  More sample resumes and cover letters.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Resume and cover letter work.  Evaluations.

WEDNESDAY:  3-14-07 (Meet in HSSB 1214)

ˇ         Reading:  None. 

ˇ         Writing:  All rewrites due today.  Final draft of resume and cover letter.  Bring latest version of your paper to class.  Also, make sure to bring your research blog or paper to class—or email Chris document or link.

ˇ         Class Activities:  Peer review of rewritings.  Work on resume and cover letter.  Reminder of when to pick up materials and grades.

 

Final paper due by 5 p.m. on Monday 3/18/07.  Email paper directly to Chris at cdean@writing.ucsb.edu.    

 

 

On the date of our final, you will be pick up your final papers and final grades.

HAVE A GREAT SPRING BREAK!



[1] This statement adapted from the “Guide to Constructing a Writing Program Syllabus,” which is available at http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/information/info.html.